Soil Health U

Soil Health U 2019

Jan. 23-24, Tony's Pizza Event Center, Salina, KS

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Dirt is what you sweep under the cabin rug, but soil is a living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals, and humans. Soils just don’t happen. Soil is formed from the physical and chemical weathering of rocks.  It is made up mainly of mineral particles, organic materials, air, water, and liv…

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Iowa Learning Farms, in partnership with the Iowa Nutrient Research Center and Conservation Learning Group, is hosting a free virtual soil health field day on June 18 at 1 p.m.Participants will dig into soil health with Marshall McDaniel, assistant professor in soil-plant interactions at Iow…

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Incorporating cover crops with tillage reportedly results in increased cover crop decomposition rates and increased mineralization of nutrients from cover crop biomass. Multiple studies have reported mixed results for corn-soybean grain yields when planted after cover crops.

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As interest and integration of cover crops accelerate, the industry has been challenged in its ability to provide easy to access, comprehensive information. Recently, cover crop application company GO SEED developed the Cover Crop Information Map to provide a free, centralized platform for k…

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In the wettest year on record for South Dakota, half the cropland in the state that was planted used a cropping system without tillage. That system, no-till farming, has been the predominant cropping system on South Dakota cropland in recent years, but this is the first year the practice was…

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While it’s not a new concept, an increasingly popular practice is to plant cash crops directly into living cover crops. The science behind it is sound—allowing producers to push the benefits of their cover crops to the max and take advantage of things like added organic matter and nutrient release.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced April 28 a $15 million investment to help support the adoption of innovative conservation approaches on agricultural lands. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting proposals through June 29 for national Conservation Innovation G…

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Pigweed, also known as Palmer Amaranth, is a pesky pain to passels of farmers.But that weed and others are just part of the game to Dale Strickler, agronomist for Green Cover Seed, of Bladen, Nebraska. He spoke at Soil Health U, hosted by High Plains Journal, Jan. 22 and 23, in Salina, Kansas.

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The CS Ranch in Colfax County, New Mexico, will become an outdoor classroom to teach adaptive stewardship grazing and soil health-focused management practices, June 1 to 3, the Soil Health Academy. Thanks to a contribution from the McDonald's Corporation, multiple scholarships are also avail…

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The southern High Plains of the United States have low annual rainfall. When it does rain, though, intense storms can cause severe soil erosion. Strong winds also strip away valuable topsoil.

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Knopf Farms is one of three new sites in the Soil Health Partnership network, through a partnership with the National Wheat Foundation, that is evaluating the impacts of diversified crop rotation and how wheat can benefit the soil and other environmental indicators.

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Cover crops continue to grow in popularity in Iowa due to their many benefits, reduced soil erosion, weed suppression potential, reduced nitrogen and phosphorus loads entering water bodies, and increased soil organic matter. Iowa Learning Farms and the United States Department of Agriculture…

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A wholesale shift to regenerative agriculture is soon to become the primary choice for survival, Tom Cannon told audiences at Soil Health U, Jan. 22 and 23, in Salina, Kansas. The farmer and manager of Goodson Ranch, near Blackwell, in north-central Oklahoma, warned of a potential extinction…

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It’s been said that America has the most plentiful, safe and nutritious food supply in the world. In 2018, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service reported that 89.9% of U.S. households were food secure throughout the year, with 11.1% of households reporting some food …

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Shifting to farming with nature, rather than against it, is on a global campaign, and the proof is in the testaments of international visitors to the U.S. Tom and Cassi Robinson, of Hoyleton, Australia, and Laurent Lorre, who farms near Janville, some 50 miles south of Paris, France, attende…

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Deciding to work with nature instead of against it has made a huge difference to Darin Williams. The farmer and his wife, Nancy, from Coffey County in southeast Kansas embraced a return to natural systems agriculture in 2010. The couple cut their workload, time on the tractor, input costs, f…

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Officials at Eastern Iowa Airport in Cedar Rapids partnered with USDA to improve soil health and protect water quality on the airport’s 2,000 cropland acres. 

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Soil Health U, held Jan. 22 to 23 in Salina, Kansas, did not disappoint when it came to panels aimed at explaining techniques, personal experiences and advice pertaining to regenerative agriculture. The event, in its third year and sponsored by High Plains Journal, held three separate panels…

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There are many benefits to utilizing cover crops, such as improved soil health and reduced erosion, but the details can present challenges. The Nebraska Cover Crop and Soil Health Conference will provide information to growers who are just getting started with cover crops and to those who ha…

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Kansas State University Extension Ag Economist Monte Vandeveer said professionals and farmers alike have been talking about the 2018 farm bill even before 2018 ticked over on the calendar. 

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Oohs and ahs were evidence of impact rumbling through the crowd while Ray Archuleta stunned folks with visual appeal the morning of Jan. 22. The stark contrast of photos flashed on the screen in Heritage Hall snared the attention of some 600 people who were attending the third annual Soil He…

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The 2020 Soil Health U and Trade Show is this Wednesday and Thursday, Jan. 22 and 23, at the Tony’s Pizza Events Center, Salina, Kansas. The event, hosted by High Plains Journal, will offer many opportunities for producers to dig in and learn about regenerative agriculture, the carbon cycle,…

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Soil health is the foundation of regenerative agriculture and one of the speakers for the upcoming Soil Health U relishes an opportunity to help producers understand that connection. Reginaldo “Regi” Haslett-Marroquin, a native of Guatemala and founder of the Regenerative Agriculture Allianc…

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Farmers are aware of the benefits of soil health. However, the difficulty in quantifying soil health, diminishing availability of land that results in higher land prices, the time necessary to improve soil health, and the need to turn a profit often discourage farmers from adopting soil heal…

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As we look back through the last 12 months, it is safe to say 2019 was a trying time for most agricultural producers. From unprecedented flooding during critical planting periods leading to delays in fall harvest to the brutal winter that battered the majority of livestock operations, the sp…

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Iowa farmer and past Iowa Soybean Association President Ray Gaesser thought he was doing everything he could to protect his farm from erosion and soil loss. He had switched to no-till more than 20 years ago and built terraces. But a true defining moment was a 4-inch rain in one hour.

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No-till is one of the most popular and effective conservation practices but making the switch from tilling to not can be intimidating. No-till allows farmers to grow crops with minimal disturbance to their fields and the organisms that live in the soil. This increases soil health while also …

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There are more than 2 million farms across the United States, tended by men, women and families who produce the crops that feed, fuel and clothe the world. They care deeply for the lands and waters that sustain their livelihoods, but as the global population continues to grow, our nation’s f…

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A new sprayable bioplastic—made of cornstarch and other natural ingredients—offers potential as an effective method for delivering beneficial microbes to fight aflatoxins and other agricultural pathogens and pests.

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Conservation gives many gifts – both to farmers and the rest of the world. Each breath of air, sip of water, and bite of food you will ever take exists because of natural resources and how we protect them.