Rush of emotions for me

The last of the trucks in the convoy make their way through Dodge City on their way to Nebraska, April 27. (Journal photo by Kylene Scott.)

As I watched the trucks make the hill on the overpass road on their way through Dodge City April 27 I got a little teary eyed.

My boys and I had just watched the Ashes to Ashes hay convoy go through town on their way to Nebraska with their second convoy of hay and supplies for farmers and ranchers affected by the flooding that happened mid-March. The group is from the Englewood, Ashland and Clark County areas of Kansas and into the Oklahoma panhandle.

From the backseat I could hear my oldest going on and on about the trucks. He knows the significance of being on the receiving end of donated hay, and it doesn’t hurt he loves everything truck. He was there when we got some hay donated after the Starbuck fire in 2017. He saw the supplies someone left at the farm for us to use.

Over and over I’ve seen stories of families affected by disasters, and over and over I’ve seen photos and social media posts of farmers helping farmers, ranchers helping ranchers. It makes me proud to be part of an industry that takes care of their own.

But it was also exciting to get to show my boys how much people do care. They know hay costs money. They know trucks cost money. For me, as a mother and a livestock producer it was nice to be able to show them how people come together and help each other out.

Here’s a few photos I took of the convoy. If you have comments or stories to share, don’t hesitate to contact me.

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