If you're interested in submitting a Letter to the Editor, click here.

  • 0

Many farmers I’ve visited with over the last couple of weeks are happy to see commodity prices staying relatively high and are excited about replacing some outdated equipment. But that bullishness heading into 2022 is tempered by what they’ve been paying for inputs, especially fertilizer. Read more

  • 0

March 9, 2021, is when it really all began. That was the night that in excess of 400 people gathered in Valentine, Nebraska, to get more information about the federal government’s 30x30 plan. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Challenges are piling up for United States farmers and livestock producers. Continuing supply chain problems, increasing input costs, labor shortages and rising interest rates threaten profitability across the farm belt. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

On Jan. 11 it was said boxed beef prices were the highest they had been in a month. But the problem is that it has nothing to do with what is paid to the ordinary cattleman. Read more

  • 0

Social media has been full recently of the typical posts about what people are hoping to accomplish in 2022. Read more

  • 0

In mid-November, I traveled from my farming and beef cattle operation to Kansas City for an ag media event called “Trade Talk.” Hosted by the National Association of Farm Broadcasters, this annual event offers ag industry broadcast personalities the opportunity to interview representatives from various organizations and companies, all of whom serve this country’s farmers and ranchers in some capacity. As the vice chair of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board this year, I did several interviews, an… Read more

  • 0

We have a serious monopoly in the meatpacking business. In the late 1800s in New York City alone there were nearly 100 independent meatpackers. They were located in what is still called the meatpacking district, although now it is all condos and residences and there are no sides of swinging beef. Read more

  • 0

Derecho-like windstorms that hit the High Plains on Dec. 15, 2021, spurred wildfires that scorched a four-county region in the corridor of Ellis, Rooks, Russell and Osborne counties in Kansas. It was a reminder of how fickle Mother Nature can be in the heart of beef country. Read more

  • 0

Producers and landowners have opportunities to protect their land and enhance its value through multiple programs available from several federal agencies. Generally, the stated purposes of these programs are to “help producers and landowners make conservation improvements, build resiliency, and reduce climate change impacts.” Read more

  • 0

A few months ago, it seemed possible to suggest that COVID-19 might be declining and some sense of normalcy returning to our lives—at least for those of us who are vaccinated and received boosters. But as we look ahead to 2022 and the newest variant sweeping across the globe, it’s clear that the virus and related labor and supply disruptions will still have a major impact on the economy for at least the foreseeable future. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Sometimes it can feel daunting and downright frustrating to know what factors affect grain prices these days. With a global marketplace, there is more to monitor and understand than just the crop growing in your backyard. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

The year 2021 went by quickly and with all the disruptions it did not make it any easier on farmers, ranchers and rural communities. Read more

  • 0

Christmas 2021 is upon us and I wonder how many folks are thinking, “Man, I thought 2020 was a bad year but who could have guessed 2021 would be worse?” I spent a full day this past week in Paradise, Kansas. I am so inspired by the resolve of those Kansans in the heat of the storm. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Numbers are everywhere. As calendar digits march toward the 2021 finish line, we gear up for the next 365. We watch them countdown and celebrate with confetti. Even though they surround us, it is imperative we believe our own prime, our best, has no magic number. Read more

  • 0

You may not see your urban cousins coming in droves, but it appears that a bit of rural renaissance is happening as more individuals—especially those who are tired of being cooped up during the pandemic—decide they can live and work in rural areas of the country. Read more

  • 0

How many of you have heard of the World Organization of Animal Health? It was founded in 1924, through an international agreement to “ensure transparency in the global animal disease situation, in order to collect, analyze and disseminate veterinary scientific information.” Through the years, it has encouraged international cohesion to control animal diseases and set standards for veterinary services, resulting in a safeguard for international trade in animals and their products. Read more

  • 0

One day in the not-too-distant future, you may walk into your local supermarket and next to the ground beef, you will see something different. It will look like ground beef, and it might even say “ground beef” on the label, but somewhere in impossibly small type, it will also say “cultured.” Read more

  • 0

In the rare event that this Christmas season brings about a level of boredom and you need a rabbit trail to run through, I would suggest you search a couple of key phrases that have been used throughout the course of our nation's history. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Holiday festivities and year-end pressures make this a busy time of year for most businesses. Even so, there’s still enough time left in December to perform a financial check-up for your farm, ranch or agriculture operation. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Most cattle auctions are having their last week of sales for the year. We had our cow sale and sold 1,060 cows, bulls and a few calves. Most packers will put some cows on feed particularly to have enough cows for filler to keep the processing plant numbers to where they need to be. Read more

  • 0

You don’t have to travel very far in Oklahoma to understand how important farming and agriculture are to our state. We are the second-largest beef-cow-producing state and fourth-largest wheat producing state in the nation. Oklahoma is also home to over 86,000 farms, covering 35 million acres. Farms and ranches have been passed down in many families from generation to generation—our agricultural roots run very deep. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Rural America is positioned for growth. Right now—more than ever before—we are seeing people return to their roots and it’s the rural community’s time to shine. The pandemic has changed us. It’s caused each of us to stop, think and pivot when necessary. For many, it’s taking us back home. Read more

  • 0

I recognize that this is not really “news” to most folks but the more time I spend really studying the history of this country, the more I realize that what we are taught as history class is only a selective portrayal of a portion of the truth. Martin Van Buren, one of the United States presidents that I knew very little about, turns out to be the right person to study relative to the current status of our nation and the world. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

It seems like our calves have sold a little later than most years with a lot of calves being sold now. And most of those calves are weaned at least 40 days to a long time. Read more

  • 0

The “Caterpillar Coloring Book” provides readers an opportunity to learn about yesterday’s powerhouse machinery and a glimpse into what might be ahead from the world’s largest construction equipment manufacturer. Read more

  • 0

In 2015, the Obama administration enacted its Waters of the United States Rule. The absurdly overreaching scheme would have gone as far as regulating drainage ditches and streams that only flow after heavy rainfall. Fortunately, it was replaced with the more sensible Navigable Waters Protection Rule, or NWPR, in 2020. That rule set clear and reasonable standards for federal regulation of water features that property owners could interpret without spending tens of thousands of dollars on … Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

Just weeks ago, soybean futures prices looked poised to sink well below the $12-a-bushel threshold and fall potentially $1 lower as traders were anticipating a larger crop in South America and a large United States crop to be planted in spring 2022. Read more

  • 0

In the Chinese Zodiac, 2021 is known as the Year of the Ox. The Year of the Ox occurs every 12 years and is a year of ambition, relationships, and luck. According to the zodiac, it’s a year that with some hard work, should end well. Read more

  • 0

As the Thanksgiving season has passed by, our appetite now moves toward Christmas. While there is a natural attraction to look to buying online and there are good reasons to do so, we recognize in rural communities sales tax dollars are important to meet local needs. Read more

  • 0

It is very clear to me that Thanksgiving 2021 was the most important in my 55 years on earth. We need to continue to be thankful to God for the blessings he has bestowed upon us, but yet pray harder than ever. Read more

  • 0

What exactly does the term “conservative” mean in today’s world? Does it simply mean spend less than what “liberals” want? I think the majority of Americans have seen enough of this nonsense and it is clear there is not one conservative left at the federal level of politics, and I am talking about the federal level since 1988. Read more

  • 0

Since its creation, the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality's Brownfields Program has worked with local governments, Tribes, nonprofits and private entities to provide education and support for the cleanup, sustainable reuse, and redevelopment of Brownfield properties—which are former industrial or commercial sites where future use is affected by real or perceived environmental contamination. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

In order to store soil moisture prior to spring planting of grain sorghum, it is critical to control weeds during the winter months.

This is best achieved with a combination of soil residual herbicides and products that control weeds that have already emerged. The most common winter weeds are marestail, prickly lettuce, Canadian thistle, henbit and numerous mustard species in addition to several winter grasses. Although kochia is not considered a winter weed, it is increasingly becoming a problem in the late winter. Read more