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The U.S. Wheat Associates board of directors elected new officers for the July 2019 to June 2020 fiscal year at their recent meeting in Washington, D.C. The board elected Rhonda K. Larson of East Grand Forks, Minnesota, as secretary-treasurer; Darren Padget of Grass Valley, Oregon, as vice c…

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Farmers and agribusinesses eagerly anticipated the updated Feb. 8 World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates out of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The agency will not publish January 2019 estimates due to the federal government shutdown.

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Oklahoma wheat that was planted in October and November should be reaching first hollow stem sometime in February and March.

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Agricultural producers have until Feb. 14 to sign up for USDA’s Market Facilitation Program, launched last year to help producers suffering from damages due to unjustified trade retaliation. Producers can apply without proof of yield but must certify 2018 production by May 1. Since its launc…

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The Texas Wheat Producers Board will hold its biennial election to elect five board members to fill expiring positions. The election, to be held by mail, officially begins March 22 and will conclude April 5.

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High school seniors pursuing careers in agriculture are encouraged to apply for the 2019 Herb Clutter Memorial Scholarship, administered by the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers. 

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Current trade negotiations and retaliations could very well wind up having lasting effects on the future wheat trade, cautioned Frayne Olson, director of the Quentin Burdick Center for Cooperatives at North Dakota State University. Olson encouraged growers to pay heed to these issues and kee…

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The wheat industry is digging a hole that we may not be able to get out of, and it has a lot to do with the blame game. It appears as though we in the wheat industry are following in the footsteps of politicians in Washington.

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WB4418, a new Hard Red Winter Wheat variety from St. Louis-based WestBred wheat, offers excellent straw strength, coupled with excellent resistance to pests like Hessian Fly.

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Dan Wogsland, executive director of the North Dakota Grain Growers Association, told farmers there are some solid wins for them in the 2018 farm bill.

Wogsland spoke at the 2019 Wheat U, sponsored by BASF and High Plains Journal Jan. 17, in Bismarck, North Dakota. Northern wheat and barley farmers aren’t the only winners, though, he explained. There are opportunities for farmers across the United States.

“There are a lot of wins in this farm bill, but perhaps most important are the improvements in the ARC and PLC programs,” he said. “There are also improvements in crop insurance. And funding for Market Access Program and Foreign Market Development programs are essential to getting our products sold worldwide. In North Dakota, 50 percent of our wheat has to go overseas.” 

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The National Wheat Foundation is pleased to announce that it is accepting grower enrollment for the 2019 National Wheat Yield Contest. The Contest is divided into two primary competition categories: winter wheat and spring wheat, and two subcategories: dryland and irrigated. The foundation i…

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Arbor Biosciences, a worldwide leader in next generation sequencing target enrichment and synthetic biology, announces its partnership with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, an international organization dedicated to developing a gold-standard reference genome for bread w…

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service released its Situation and Outlook Report for Wheat in December. 

The ERS projects all United States wheat exports for the 2018-2019 marketing year will be cut by 25 million bushels to 1 billion total. 

“Export sales through the first six months of the marketing year are projected to constitute just 41 percent of the current marketing year total,” according to the report. This is behind the 10-year average of 52 percent.

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The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Randall County will conduct the annual Pre-Plant Producer Update Meeting from 9 a.m. to noon Jan. 30 at the Kuhlman Extension Center, 200 N. Brown Road, Canyon.

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Justin Knopf has a pretty good idea of the quality of wheat he grows each year on his Salina, Kansas, farm.

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Wyatt Merry of Texhoma, Oklahoma, has a passion for farming. He’s only 14 but his mother, Jessica Merry, said Wyatt has loved agriculture from the beginning.

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Colorado wheat farmers are invited to attend and participate in the annual county business meetings and elections jointly sponsored by the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee , the Colorado Association of Wheat Growers and the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation. The business meetings and…

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service released its Situation and Outlook Report for Wheat Dec. 13.

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After a mission trip to Africa in 2003, Monte Stewart and his wife, Shelly, decided they wanted to find a way to feed hungry people in impoverished countries. They began their non-profit organization, which is now Stamp Out Starvation, in 2007 and Monte worked part-time for the first five ye…

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Wheat growers in western Kansas may have an opportunity in upcoming years to grow durum varieties thanks to the Kansas State University Wheat Breeding Program. Although durum is not traditionally grown in Kansas because it is normally a spring wheat, Andy Auld, assistant agronomist, and Alla…

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The sixth annual Red River Crops Conference: Planning for Success, offering crop production information designed for southwest Oklahoma and the Texas Rolling Plains, is set for Jan. 23 to 24, 2019, in the Childress Event Center, 1100 NW 7th St. in Childress.

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The Texas Wheat Symposium, Nov. 28, in Amarillo, Texas, brought farmers out to the Amarillo Farm Show to hear updates on markets, policy and weather.

Mark Welch, Texas A&M University AgriLife Extension economist, gave a market outlook for 2019.

Welch said world consumption continues to be very strong in the grain complex, despite the drought of 2012 and the economic slump of 2013 and 2014. There is a strong correlation between the per capita grain consumption pattern and the emerging economies of Brazil, Russia, India, China, Mexico and Southeast Asia.

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Wheat acres in Kansas will likely be lower than last year, possibly reaching 100-year lows in the state. Last year's 7.7 million planted acres were the third lowest in a century. 

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Rain and snow in Oklahoma is making a difference in the drought, according to Wes Lee with the Oklahoma Mesonet.

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Given current soybean prices, many producers will consider planting additional acres of corn, wheat and cotton in 2019. While final spring 2019 planting decisions are months away, fertilizer, and especially nitrogen, are a significant share of the crop budgets for these crops. This column re…

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Kansas wheat farmers will potentially see and feel effects from the El Niño weather pattern expected to move into the United States over the next six months. Although the El Niño is expected to be fairly weak, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center has predicted that most of the country is going t…

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United States Department of Agriculture expects global wheat consumption to remain at record high levels in 2018-19 due to increased human consumption. Human wheat consumption is expected to reach a record high 602 million metric tons, 4 percent above the 5-year average. Over the past ten ye…

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Delegates from the U.S. agriculture industry were in Cuba recently for the Cuba-U.S. Agriculture Business Conference. The conference brought about much interest from the Cuban Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Cuban media.

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November is a great time for pumpkin spice and everything nice, but it's also the perfect time to celebrate National Bread Month. In addition to being the nation's leader, on average, in wheat production, Kansas also ranks second in wheat flour produced, both important steps on the road to t…

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The National Wheat Foundation recently announced the national winners for the 2018 National Wheat Yield Contest. Now NWF is announcing state winners for the 2018 contest, which includes 82 growers from 23 states.“It’s great to see winners from such states as New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vir…

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The Texas Wheat Symposium will be Nov. 28, in conjunction with the Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show in the Grand Plaza Room at the Amarillo Civic Center. The free event will begin at 10 a.m.

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China’s National Bureau of Statistics revised the country’s area, yield and production estimates for corn, wheat and rice for the last decade in October, reported the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agricultural Service. According to its November World Agricultural Supply and Demand…

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The National Wheat Foundation’s National Wheat Yield Contest offers growers the opportunity to compete with farmers from across the United States and improve their production practices through new and innovative techniques. NWF announced the national winners for the 2018 National Wheat Yield…

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Today most Americans are three generations removed from the farm, so tales from the tractor are more important now than ever.

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Recent and abundant rains in some areas have producers concerned about leaf rust that is appearing in High Plains wheat fields. 

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The fall of the year is often a convenient time for those involved in cow-calf share and cash leases of spring calving cows to revisit the terms of the agreement. Market values of cattle, interest rates, pasture rental rates and feed costs can change significantly from year to year. Discussi…

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Republican congressman Frank Lucas of Oklahoma, a member of the Farm Bill Conference Committee, said we could have a new farm bill by the end of the year.

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Autumn is seen as the best time of the year for many folks. The leaves are changing colors, cooler temperatures replace the unbearable summer heat, and the combines are harvesting this year’s crop. What could go wrong? This year, with the prolonged wet weather this fall, normal agricultural …