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The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its November World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report, Nov. 8, which showed the affect of a tough growing season and challenging fall harvest across much of the United States.

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The Texas Wheat Symposium will be Dec. 4 in conjunction with the Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show in the Grand Plaza Room at the Amarillo Civic Center. The free event will begin at 10 a.m.

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At 211.59 bushels per acre, Rick Pearson’s AgriPro SY Ovation entry from Buhl, Idaho, broke all expectations for the 2019 National Wheat Yield Contest. It won the Bin Buster Award for the Irrigated Class and set a new record.

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Mother Nature has decided to swing around from season to season with no rhyme or reason over the last few weeks, and that ever-changing weather pattern may have some effects on Kansas wheat. K-State Research and Extension Agronomy's E-Update has the latest information on the rapidly changing…

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“This river in general is very handsome, except at the rapid, where it is risking both life and property to pass.”—From the journal of Sgt. Patrick Gass, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report Oct. 10 as several major crops are now projected to see a decline in harvested bushels.

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For the week ending Oct. 28, USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service reported the following:Nebraska: Winter wheat condition rated 3% very poor, 8 poor, 28 fair, 48 good, and 13 excellent. Winter wheat emerged was 92%, near 88 last year and 91 average.Kansas: Winter wheat condition r…

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November is a great time for pumpkin spice and everything nice, but it’s also the perfect time to celebrate National Bread Month. The wheat that Kansas grows is exceptionally adept at creating tasty, homemade bread, so be sure to celebrate this homegrown holiday.

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Raegan Klaassen, daughter of Chris and Ginger Klaassen, was awarded the overall grand champion award showing her Doublestop CL Plus variety in the 2019 Oklahoma 4-H/FFA Junior Wheat Show. Klaassen placed second in production and milling and fifth in baking, earning her the title of first pla…

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Reading the directions on the back of a cake mix box and adding the ingredients step by step may seem simple enough but it is no easy feat to ensure the consumer ends up with a consistent cake from box to box. How do baked good brands stay the same store to store, how does a cake get its per…

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For the week ending Oct. 13, USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service reported the following wheat crop conditions:

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Justin Knopf of Knopf Farms near Gypsum, Kansas, is a fifth-generation farmer and a partner in a diversified operation that grows wheat, alfalfa, corn, soybeans, and sorghum.

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National Association of Wheat Growers’ CEO Chandler Goule was named a recipient of the 2019 CropLife America Annual Jay Vroom Agricultural Ambassador Award. The award honors a member or an allied organization to CLA who has made a major contribution to public education about pesticides and t…

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Putting cattle on wheat pasture is not always a matter of grazing the wheat out or waiting until the first hollow wheat stem appears. There are some ways to more efficiently use wheat pasture for stocker calves, and even for cows, while also meeting nutrition requirements for better gain. Some of the challenges with putting cattle on wheat pasture include weather, available forage and health issues.

“It can be kind of a risky business and there’s a lot more to get into financially with stocker calves than maybe there was 10 or 15 years ago,” said Dana Zook, northwest Oklahoma area livestock specialist.

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USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service reported the following winter wheat conditions in the High Plains and Midwest for the week ending Oct. 6:

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On Sept. 30, USDA released its Small Grains Summary noting that 2019-20 U.S. wheat production increased to 53.3 million metric tons, up 4 percent from last year due to significant improvements in yield despite lower planted area. While this is still 2 percent below the 5-year average of 54.2…

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USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service may update acreage, yield, production and stocks estimates for barley, oats, Durum wheat and other spring wheat in the Nov. 8 Crop Production report. Estimates included in the Small Grains 2019 Summary released on Sept. 30 were based on a sampl…

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Farms have always been data-driven. From the paper ledgers of our grandparents, to the computerized Excel spreadsheets of our parents, keeping a ledger of crop inputs, agronomy practices, market prices and more is integral to making a farm profitable.

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Wheat came to Kansas in 1839, and for the next 180 years the state would forever be known as “America’s Breadbasket” and a major supplier of the nation’s pantries.

Tracking crop production statistics was in the national interest and one of the reasons why President Abraham Lincoln asked Congress to establish the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1862. The goal was to gather crop information from the farmers on the ground and compile a report that could stop speculation in the marketplace.

Recently, the USDA-National Agricultural Statistics Service released the “Kansas Wheat History” report, which compiles records kept by statisticians all the way back to 1919. The report shows that in the last 30 years, wheat acres planted and harvested have seen a steady decline, whether based on weather or market factors.

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Wheat is the world’s largest rain-fed crop in terms of harvested area and supplies about 20% of all calories consumed by humans. A new study has found that unless steps are taken to mitigate climate change, up to 60% of current wheat-growing areas worldwide could see simultaneous, severe and…

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The baking contest was almost over at the Oklahoma State Fair and Katherine Ereman was in the audience anxiously awaiting the judge’s verdict. As the entries were brought out, her heart sank when she saw that her cheesy onion bread was fourth in line.

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The Sept. 12 World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report from the United States Department of Agriculture brought some good news to soybean growers and dairymen, while corn growers saw a dimmer light at the end of the tunnel. 

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In a new study, scientists have found that genome segments from a wild grass are present in more than one in five of elite bread wheat lines developed by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT).

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The smell of animal barns and the quiet sizzle of frying foods fill the air. The Ferris wheel towers over the midway. The hard work of 4-Hers, FFA students and open class participants line the walls of buildings. The subtle roar of carnival barkers and the muffled screams from Ye Old Mill we…

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Bob Delsing of Hemingford and Mark Knobel of Fairbury were elected chair and vice chair respectively of the Nebraska Wheat Board during the board’s most recent meeting. Both will serve in that capacity for a period of one year.

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Attendees at the first combined Sorghum U/Wheat U event at the Kansas Star Event Center in Mulvane, Kansas, were the big winners Aug. 14. Sorghum U/Wheat U was sponsored by High Plains Journal and IntelliFarms.

A farmer panel brought the experiences of four farmers from varied backgrounds, and kicked the day off. The farmer panel included Mike Younger, Bison, Kansas, a diversified wheat and sorghum grower; Justin Knopf, a Saline County, Kansas, farmer who is also vice president of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers; Kent Martin, a sixth generation farmer from Alva, Oklahoma, and Kent Winter, Andale, Kansas, farmer and president of Kansas Grain Sorghum.

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Hidden in the stubble of 2019's wheat harvest, wheat curl mites are moving to find sprouting volunteer wheat seedlings to inhabit and continue the life cycle of wheat streak mosaic virus. The wheat streak mosaic virus instigated by these mites seriously affects the total yield of a wheat crop. 

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Wheat is an integral part of many Kansas 4-H members’ agronomy projects—after all, the state typically raises almost one-fifth of the wheat grown in the United States year after year.

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There was a time when passing out recipe booklets and samples at the grocery store were the height of reaching a consumer audience. Back when housewives physically wandered the aisles with their coupons and their lists, doing the daily shopping, it was easy for farmers and ranchers to reach them with their pitches about their commodities.

But times change.

Meal delivery services, a rise in dining out, even the ability to order groceries online and have them delivered to your car are all taking the consumer out of the grocery store. Today the tactics of checkoff organizations, tasked with research, education, marketing and promotion on behalf of their farmers, have to take on a new dimension to reach the buying public.

 Enter the food blogger influencer. 

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A 65-year comparative analysis between U.S. yields of irrigated and rain-fed crops has sounded a message to farmers, land managers and policymakers: Mind the gap.

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The sun beats down as Jeff Noel stares out at miniature fields of wheat near Yuma, Arizona. These aren’t the sprawling yellow fields of grain from western Nebraska. Each mini field or plot measures less than 75 square feet. As the director of Husker Genetics, part of Noel’s job is production…

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Folks across the country find all kinds of ways to celebrate their favorite universities and sports teams.

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It was supposed to be a speech about energy in Pennsylvania on Aug. 13 but President Donald Trump strayed from his prepared remarks to discuss trade with Japan.

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American farmers were unable to plant more than 19 million acres to crops this year. That’s the most prevented plant acres reported since 2007, and nearly 17.5 million acres more than were reported this time last year.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency released its Crop Acreage Data Report Aug. 12.

“Of those prevented plant acres, more than 73% were in 12 Midwestern states, where heavy rainfall and flooding this year has prevented many producers from planting mostly corn, soybeans and wheat,” according to the release.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its hotly anticipated monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates on Aug. 12. This report was expected to show the updated July USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service acreage numbers for corn and soybeans. 

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The 43rd annual Randall County Ag Day and Crops Tour, hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, is set for Aug. 27 at the Kuhlman Extension Center, 200 N. Brown Road, Canyon.