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The early months of 2022 offer great opportunities for Kansas wheat farmers to kick off the new year. Mark your calendars for these meetings in early 2022 for a chance to gather with industry peers across the state and gain insights into management and other topics immediately applicable to this year’s wheat crop and Kansas farming operations. Read more

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Global and domestic demand for wheat slowed slightly as both supplies and prices increased, according to the latest World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates of the U.S. Department of Agriculture released Dec. 9.

The outlook for 2021-22 United States wheat in December was for slightly lower supplies, unchanged domestic use, reduced exports, and higher ending stocks. Supplies are lowered on decreased imports with a weaker-than-expected pace for hard red spring wheat. Read more

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The Nov. 16 announcement that Vietnam’s government will eliminate a 3% tariff on U.S. wheat imports effective Dec. 30 is welcome news to producers at home and their customers and wheat food processors in Vietnam.

U.S. Wheat Associates and the National Association of Wheat Growers appreciate the efforts by the Joe Biden administration, USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service and Vietnam’s Ministry of Finance toward eliminating this tariff, which follows a reduction from 5% to 3% in July 2020. Read more

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The Purdue University/CME Group Ag Economy Barometer slipped 5 points in November to a reading of 116 as producers continue to be pessimistic about both the current and future outlook of the agricultural economy. The Index of Current Conditions declined 7 points in November to a reading of 128, and the Index of Future Expectations fell 4 points to 110. Read more

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Tyler Ediger and his father, Darwin, are seasoned veterans of the National Wheat Yield Contest, having submitted entries from their farming operation near Meade since the start of the contest six years ago. That experience—combined with informed management and nearly perfect growing conditions—made it no surprise that the father-son duo took first and second place for the state of Kansas in the 2021 contest. Read more

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Look at a line graph that tracks freight markets over the last two years and you may mistake it for the very waves the vessels traverse on the open ocean. Up and down the vessel goes, and so have the rates. Read more

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Withstanding weather challenges, disease pressure and more, Kansas farmers once again proved how informed management can maximize yield potential year-in and year-out during the 2021 National Wheat Yield Contest. National and state winners were recently released by the National Wheat Foundation, which organizes the competition. Read more

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The Texas Wheat Symposium will be Dec. 1, in conjunction with the Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show in the Grand Plaza Room at the Amarillo Civic Center. The free event will begin at 10:30 a.m. Read more

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Having weeds in wheat is nothing new for farmers in Oklahoma and Kansas. Misha Manuchehri, Oklahoma State University Extension weed specialist, told attendees at Farmer U and Trade Show, in Mulvane, Kansas, this summer that weed control is often difficult to achieve.

“And I think I have learned that it's something that's very difficult to do, especially on the long term,” she said. “Short term we can manage weeds pretty well with herbicides, but long term we typically are running into herbicide resistance issues.”

In Manuchehri’s session, she focused on winter annual grasses affecting wheat stands and gave her thoughts on what herbicides to use to help control them. First she discussed brome weeds, or what is most commonly referred to as cheat. There are a variety of species of this type, and all respond to herbicides differently. Read more

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As wheat farmers planted winter wheat, they looked back on a year hit by drought. This summer’s drought in the Dakotas and Minnesota eased enough to let corn and soybeans rebound to better-than-expected yields in those areas, but the moisture came too late for the wheat crop. Some Minnesota wheat farmers are reporting only half the yields they were hoping for. Read more

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Rain across Kansas was welcome last week, especially as nearly half of the Kansas wheat crop has now been planted and is starting to emerge. Producers—both those waiting now for fields to dry out enough to continue planting and those turning their attention to monitoring crop progress and condition—have new resources available to address key management areas. Read more

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Nebraska Extension received a $1.2 million On-Farm Conservation Innovation grant from USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service which connects corn and wheat producers across Nebraska with access to cutting-edge technologies through on-farm research. Read more

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Oklahoma State University Extension, Jackson County Extension and Western Oklahoma State College, are hosting an early season wheat management meeting from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sept. 23, in the Western Oklahoma State College’s Pioneer Room in Altus, Oklahoma. Read more

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Early sowing of wheat can lead to several problems, from increased chances of insect- or mite-transmitted viral diseases to decreased emergence due to high temperatures and its consequences on wheat germination of particular varieties and reduced coleoptile length. Read more

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It’s nearly time for the smell of cinnamon rolls baking and the sound of laughter as families explore Agriland to permeate through the Pride of Kansas building at the Kansas State Fair. Celebrate Kansas agriculture by riding in a virtual combine, sifting different types of grain between your fingers or milking Maybelle the mechanical cow—the newest addition to the exhibit. And don’t forget to request another staple for this time of year—Kansas Wheat’s annual recipe booklet. Read more

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Mother Nature threw about everything in the weather book this past year at the statewide wheat crop—from drought to floods and heavy ice to late freezes. Such conditions allow experts with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Texas A&M AgriLife Research to see how varieties grow under adversity and select top performers. Read more

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A team of scientists has identified a promising resistance gene that could help fight a devastating fungus called stem rust, which attacks wheat crops and threatens global food security. The discovery, recently published in Nature Plants, also identifies a gene in the fungus that triggers this resistance in the host plant, and together these discoveries provide a pathway to help wheat growers defend against this disease. Read more

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The rain delays and weather concerns that plagued this year’s growing season and dogged down harvest progress indicate favorable conditions for volunteer wheat establishment. As a result, Kansas producers cannot let down their guard on controlling volunteer wheat as they prepare for the next growing season, lest they leave open the door for wheat streak mosaic virus and other diseases to survive the winter. Read more

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More than 110 customers from across South America, representing 92 different companies, tuned in on July 15 for a virtual wheat crop update. U.S. Wheat Associates, the industry’s export market development organization, organized the activity, which included reports on the hard red winter and soft red winter wheat harvests from Kansas and Oklahoma. Read more

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Mary Guttieri’s journey to Manhattan, Kansas, has been a long one. She started her career as an organic chemist, and she now works in wheat genetics, battling some of the crop’s harshest enemies. Guttieri is a research geneticist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, working in the Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit. Read more

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Few couples can say they were together for 80 years, but Roland and Arloine McCreery have many achievements to their name that most cannot claim. The McCreerys were custom harvesters for 50 years and are founding members of the U.S. Custom Harvesters, Inc. At 91 years old, Roland has put his remaining farm equipment up for sale in an online auction to be held Aug. 2. Read more

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Back in the days of World War II, even though the war was being fought overseas, Americans were hit hard by rationing. Steel, rubber, gasoline, sugar and many other foodstuffs needed to support the troops could only be purchased by the public when accompanied by ration stamps. The War Food Administration asked Americans to sow 13.8 million more acres of wheat than the previous year, and somehow it had to be harvested. Read more

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The Texas wheat grain crop faced a number of challenges this season from extreme weather to disease, but the overall expectation is that acres will produce average or slightly below average yields, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Read more