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USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service reported the following sorghum conditions for the week ending Nov. 10:

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National Sorghum Producers recently announced a partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kansas. The partnership will be executed through a conservation collaboration grant that will document sorghum farmer practices to promote positive co…

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According to USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service for the week ending Oct. 20, sorghum conditions were as follows in the High Plains Journal coverage area:

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The unusually cool, wet weather throughout much of the United States this spring resulted in more grain sorghum acres planted later than normal. Late-planted sorghum, like any other summer crop, runs the risk of reduced yield and quality due to an early freeze prior to maturity.

Fortunately, high temperatures in August and September across several regions helped late-planted sorghum mature quicker than expected.

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Justin Knopf of Knopf Farms near Gypsum, Kansas, is a fifth-generation farmer and a partner in a diversified operation that grows wheat, alfalfa, corn, soybeans, and sorghum.

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The National Sorghum Producers board of directors recently elected Doug Keesling of Chase, Kansas, and re-elected three board members who started serving their three-year terms on Oct.1. Officers were also elected.

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Texas has a long history of growing cotton. It’s a resilient crop, able to withstand big swings in temperature fairly well. However, growing cotton in the same fields year after year can be a bad idea. Nutrients can get depleted. Disease can lurk in the ground during the winter season, only …

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U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue called the signing of the new United States-Japan Trade Agreement “a particularly big win for our farmers and ranchers.”

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According to USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service for the week ending Sept. 22, sorghum conditions were as follows in the High Plains Journal coverage area:

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Growers who enter the National Sorghum Producers Yield Contest by Oct. 1 will be entered into a drawing to win a $100 gift card and NSP cap. National Sorghum Producers encourages growers across the Sorghum Belt to get their entries in before harvest season arrives in many parts of the Sorghu…

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When Hennig Brandt discovered the element phosphorus in 1669, it was a mistake. He was really looking for gold. But his mistake was a very important scientific discovery. What Brandt couldn’t have realized was the importance of phosphorus to the future of farming.

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Texas A&M AgriLife sorghum research may be known for its development of sorghum for animal feed and energy sectors, but cereal eaters across the nation are learning about its contributions to healthier human foods.

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It’s been over 100 years since the Kansas State University Southwest Research-Extension Center was established in Garden City, Kansas, and researchers have found what works in their part of the state.

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National Sorghum Producers, Lubbock, Texas, has launched an enhanced version of SorghumGrowers.com with a refreshed brand and focus on increased grassroots engagement. The website offers an easy-to-use advocacy platform for enhanced member engagement along with the latest news and issues imp…

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Colorado State University Extension invites you to attend one of our Colorado Sorghum Field Days to see new and traditional hybrids side-by-side in trial plots. We will discuss hybrid characteristics, agronomy, and marketing. The field days will be held on Sept. 9 at Akron; Sept. 10 at Walsh…

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According to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, for the week ending Aug. 28, sorghum conditions were as follows in the High Plains Journal coverage area:

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The United Sorghum Checkoff Program, in coordination with the U.S. Grains Council, Kansas Grain Sorghum Commission and Texas Grain Sorghum Producers Board, is hosting international grain buyers from eight countries who are currently purchasing or are interested in U.S. grain sorghum. The Exp…

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The Nebraska Grain Sorghum Board will host four workshops for new and returning sorghum producers, educators, and industry partners in September. The workshops will provide pertinent information in regard to the harvesting and marketing of grain sorghum. Each workshop will last approximately…

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Sorghum, the third most abundant cereal crop in the United States, is emerging as a star player in the biofuels industry. With its water use efficiency, resistance to heat and low cost of seed, it has the capacity to outpace corn, especially in the West and High Plains where irrigation suppl…

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Attendees at the first combined Sorghum U/Wheat U event at the Kansas Star Event Center in Mulvane, Kansas, were the big winners Aug. 14. Sorghum U/Wheat U was sponsored by High Plains Journal and IntelliFarms.

A farmer panel brought the experiences of four farmers from varied backgrounds, and kicked the day off. The farmer panel included Mike Younger, Bison, Kansas, a diversified wheat and sorghum grower; Justin Knopf, a Saline County, Kansas, farmer who is also vice president of the Kansas Association of Wheat Growers; Kent Martin, a sixth generation farmer from Alva, Oklahoma, and Kent Winter, Andale, Kansas, farmer and president of Kansas Grain Sorghum.

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The 43rd annual Randall County Ag Day and Crops Tour, hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, is set for Aug. 27 at the Kuhlman Extension Center, 200 N. Brown Road, Canyon.

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Texas A&M researchers believe the development of climate-smart crops is the key to improving nitrogen-use efficiency and reducing fertilizer nitrogen loss in agricultural fields.

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Romulo Lollato and Jourdan Bell will be headlining sessions you won’t want to miss Aug. 14 at the Sorghum U/Wheat U event at the Kansas Star Event Center in Mulvane, Kansas. 

The combined event will give wheat and sorghum producers practical learning opportunities they can take home to implement on their own fields.

Lollato, assistant professor, wheat and forages, Kansas State University, will walk wheat producers through the latest practical research that they can take back to their farms in the coming year to improve their yield and quality production goals. 

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Agronomists often divide sorghum into three growth stages.

Growth stage I begins with emergence and continues to panicle initiation, lasting approximately 35 days. During this stage, the sorghum plant can withstand significant stress from environmental conditions or pests without effecting yield because new leaves are being produced to replace damaged leaves and the growing point is below or very near the soil surface allowing it to avoid direct injury. Growth stage II begins with panicle initiation and continues to half-bloom, also lasting approximately 35 days. Growth stage III begins with half-bloom and continues until the grain reaches maturity. This column focuses on GS II.

 

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The production of food and fiber consumes 70 percent of the world’s water, placing a burden on farmers to increase water productivity and efficiency. The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research awarded a $1 million Seeding Solutions grant to Kansas State University to increase water-eff…

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While rainfall is important for crop production, the amounts falling across the High Plains have negatively impacted row crops and agricultural operations, with potential effects extending into the summer growing season, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

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Due to excessive rainfall and other adverse weather conditions, many growers may be looking for an alternative crop. Although optimum planting dates for grain sorghum may have passed in many regions, growers typically can plant sorghum later than other crops and still make an acceptable yield at a lower risk.

Input costs are less than most other crops. For example, sorghum seed typically costs $9 to $18 per acre depending on seeding rate, while corn seed typically costs $55 to 110 an acre depending on seeding rate and traits.

Grain sorghum can provide a number of benefits to growers, not only this year but next year. Growers typically receive a yield benefit for soybeans, cotton and corn when planted after sorghum. In addition, sorghum’s root system often can penetrate compacted soils and reduce diseases and nematodes that plague other crops. After harvest, sorghum stalks can provide excellent fodder for cattle grazing during the winter or provide ground cover and residue going into the spring.

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National Sorghum Producers and the Sorghum Checkoff are working diligently to provide information on sorghum to growers looking for plant options who have been impacted by adverse weather.

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Grain sorghum is one crop option that can provide opportunity to growers in regions impacted by historically adverse weather during the 2019 planting season. As wet conditions persist for farmers across the U.S., producers calculating options as major crop plant deadlines loom need to keep t…

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National Sorghum Producers Chairman Dan Atkisson stood alongside President Donald Trump, U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, House Agriculture Committee Ranking Member Mike Conaway and other farm and ranch representatives at an announcement ceremony May 23 concerning the a…

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Adam York has joined Kansas Grain Sorghum Commission and Kansas Grain Sorghum Producers Association as the director of programs. York has over half a decade of legislative experience working as legislative director to Congressman Steve Watkins and deputy chief of staff to Congresswoman Lynn …

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For many growers, 2019 has been a challenging year for planting and growing crops in a weed-free environment. Grain sorghum, in particular, is greatly dependent on a successful pre-emergence program. If pre-emergence herbicides were not applied or not effective due to weather conditions, gro…

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One directorship on the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Board is open for appointment. The appointment will fill directorship to represent District 3. The term for the members currently filling these seats will expire July 1. The filing deadline is no later than 5 p.m. June 12. District 3 includes th…

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