In Nebraska, hay prices were mostly steady, according to the Feb. 15 Hay Market News.

Trade was rather slow. The weather has moderated again. Some supplemental hay feeding was noted on pastures and stalk fields. Inquiry was fair, with the best interest on dairy quality hay. Some out-of-state inquiry was noted. The spot market for alfalfa pellets was steady.

In northeast Nebraska, good to premium alfalfa, in large square bales, was $120 to $130 per ton; good quality, $90 to $110; fair to good quality, in large round bales, $60 to $70; fair quality, $40 to $60. Fair to good quality alfalfa, in large round bales, ground and delivered to feedlots, was $75 to $80 per ton. Prairie hay, in small bales, was $105 per ton, in large round bales, $65 to $70. Oat hay, in mid square bales was $65 per ton. In limited trade, dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, wee $134 to $135 per ton.

In the Platte Valley, good to premium alfalfa, in large round bales, was $70 to $80 per ton; fair to good, $55 to $70, ground and delivered to feedlots, $75 to $80, few sales, $85. In very light trade, dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $134 to $135 per ton.

In northwest Iowa, hay prices were steady to $2 lower per ton. Demand was fair. Good to premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $100 to $112.50 per ton; fair to good, $80 to $100, in large square bales, $70 to $72; fair, $56 to $70. Good to premium alfalfa, in large round bales, was $65 to $72 per ton; fair to good, $55 to $70; fair, $50 to $60. Grass hay, in small bales, was $60 to $95 per ton, in large round bales, $45 to $56. Brome, in small bales, was $82.50 to $95 per ton, in large square bales, $55 to $72.50, in large round bales, $60 to $87.50.

In southwest Minnesota, fair to good alfalfa, in small bales, was $90 to $100 per ton; fair, in small bales, $60 to $90, in large square bales, $65. In large round bales, good to premium alfalfa was $60 to $87.50 per ton; fair to good, $45 to $60. Alfalfa-grass hay, in large round bales, was $45 to $60 per ton. Grass hay, in small bales, was $55 to $65 per ton, in large round bales, $20 to $55.

In Wyoming, western Nebraska and western South Dakota, the hay trade continued slow. Prices were steady to weak. Demand was moderate. Dairy quality alfalfa was in short supply.

In eastern Wyoming, premium alfalfa was $85 to $90 per ton; good, $75 to $80, in large round bales, $70. Alfalfa-grass hay was $85 to $95 per ton delivered. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $133 per ton.

In central and western Wyoming, horse alfalfa was $100 to $120 per ton. Good to premium alfalfa was $80 to $90 per ton, limited at $100. Alfalfa-timothy horse hay was $125 to $140 per ton. Premium to supreme alfalfa was $115 to $125 per ton; good, $110 delivered. Pea-oat hay was $100 per ton. Oat hay was $80 to $100.

In western Nebraska, premium horse alfalfa was $100 per ton. Supreme dairy alfalfa was $90 to $100 per ton; good, $65 to $80, in large round bales, $60 to $65. Fair to good alfalfa, ground and delivered, was $90 to $95 per ton. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 13% protein, were, less than 5 tons, $164 per ton, 5 to 12 tons, $146, 12 to 25 tons, $144, over 25 tons, $138.

In western South Dakota, supreme alfalfa was $110 per ton; good, $70 to $90, in large round bales, $65 to $80, ground and delivered, $95. Fair to good alfalfa-grass hay, in large round bales, was $45 to $65 per ton. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $165 per ton retail, %145 wholesale.

In Colorado, the hay trade was slow. Demand was moderate. Alfalfa and grass hay were steady.

In the northeast, premium alfalfa was $105 per ton; good, $80 to $90; fair, $70. Good alfalfa, ground and short haul to feedlots, was $100 to $110 per ton. Good quality grass hay was $80 to $90 per ton, in small lots to horse interests, to $100. Oat hay, in large bales, was $60 to $70 per ton.

In the southeast, supreme alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton; premium, $105 to $115; good, $90 to $100; fair, $80 to $90. Good alfalfa, ground and short haul to feedlots, was $105 to $115 per ton.

In the Mountain areas, good quality was $100 to $120 per ton. Premium grass hay, in small bales, to horse interests, was $130 to $150 per ton; good, $110 to $125, in large square bales, $100. Premium alfalfa-grass hay, in small bales, was $130 to $150 per ton.

On the Western Slope, premium alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton; good, $95 to $110. Premium grass hay, in small bales, was $130 to $145 per ton. Premium alfalfa-grass hay, in small bales, was $120 to $140 per ton, in large bales, $100.

In the San Luis Valley, supreme alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton; premium, $110 to $115; good, $100 to $105; fair, $80 to $85.

In the southwest, supreme alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton; premium, $105 to $115; good, $90 to $100; fair, $75 to $80. Premium alfalfa-grass hay was $110 to $120 per ton, in small lots, in small bales, $125 to $130.

In the East River of South Dakota, no sales were confirmed. A weaker undertone prevailed. Premium alfalfa, in small and large square bales, few sales, was $75 to $85 per ton; good, few sales, $60 to $70. In large round bales, good alfalfa was $65 to $75 per ton; fair to good, $59 to $60.

In Missouri, the markets remained consistent with last week. Many sellers were trying to move hay. There was some movement of dairy and horse hay. Prices were steady. Demand was slow to moderate. The supply was moderate.

Supreme alfalfa was $135 to $160 per ton; premium, $110 to $135. Prairie hay was $85 to $110 per ton. Good brome was $100 to $110 per ton. Good mixed grass hay, in round bales, was $25 to $30 per ton. Good timothy, in small bales, was $3 per bale. Fair fescue, in large round bales, was $15 to $25 per bale.

In Oklahoma, the alfalfa trade was light to moderate. Demand was moderate. Prices were steady to weak. The best interest was for cow quality hay. Alfalfa supplies continued tight for most offerings. Producers want to clear their barns. The hay hotline, for buyers and sellers, is 800-580-6543.

Grass hay trade and demand were light to moderate. Prices were steady to $10 lower per ton. The mild winter reduced feeding requirements, in most areas. Many hay producers reduced prices to avoid carryover.

In central and western Oklahoma, premium alfalfa, in large and small square bales, was $105 to $115 per ton, mostly $115; good, $95 to $115, in large round bales, $65 to $80; fair, in large square bales, $65 to $75, in large round bales, $50 to $60. Wheat hay, in large square bales, was $55 to $65 per ton.

In the Panhandle and western feedlot area, good grinding alfalfa, at the edge of the field or bale pile, spot, was $95 to $110 per ton; chopped and short haul to feedlots, $110 to $122. Fair alfalfa, in large round bales, was $55 to $65 per ton.

In central and eastern Oklahoma, premium grass hay, in large square bales, was $90 to $95 per ton, in small bales, $115 to $130; good, in small bales, $100 to $115. In large round bales, premium grass hay was $65 to $75 per ton; good, $55 to $70; fair, $30 to $40.

In Texas, the hay trade continued sluggish, as a result of the mild winter weather. The supply remained moderate. Trade was slow. Many buyers are anxious to move inventories to make room for this spring's new crop. Texas Panhandle buyers continued to get inquiries from Kansas and Nebraska producers. Less expensive fillers, such as cottonseed hulls, have created alternative feed ration options. A hay hotline, for buyers and sellers, is 877-429-1998.

In the Panhandle, premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $175 per ton delivered; premium to good, $145 to $160, in large round bales, $135 delivered. Fair to good grinding alfalfa, in big square and round bales, spot loads, was $91.50 to $100 per ton delivered, new crop, in big bales, July contracts, $88 delivered; chopped and delivered, few, spot loads, $99 to $108, March to April contacts, north, $96.50 to $98.50, in the south, $100 to $106. Prairie hay, in small bales, was $125 per ton delivered, in large square bales, $120 delivered. Cane hay, in small bales, was $80 per ton delivered, in big round bales, $95 delivered. Grass hay, in large round bales, was $35 per roll, in the field. Coastal hay, in small bales, was $50 per ton delivered. Cotton burrs, ground and delivered, were $28 per ton.

In north, central and east Texas, premium alfalfa, in large square bales, was $160 to $165 per ton delivered; good, in small bales, $145 delivered; fair to good, in small bales, $3 each, at the barn, in large square or round bales, $80 to $100 per ton, in the field. Haygrazer, in small bales, was $3.75 each, at the field; in big round bales, $35 to $40 per ton, at the field, $45 delivered. Coastal bermuda, in small bales, was $4 to $5.50 each delivered, in big round bales, $40 to $65 per roll, in the field.

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