In Nebraska, hay prices were steady with last week, according to the Nov. 23 Hay Market News.

Inquiry was good. Out-of-state interest was noted. Alfalfa pellets were steady.

In the northeast, premium to supreme alfalfa, RFV 185 to 225, in large bales, was $140 to $150 per ton; good to premium, RFV 150 to 180, in large bales, $110 to $130; good quality, $90 to $110; good to premium, RFV 170 and up, in large round bales, $85 to $90; good to premium, RFV 150 to 180, in large round bales, $70 to $85; good, in large round bales, ground and delivered to feedlots, $85 to $90; fair to good, in large round bales, $80 to $85. Prairie hay, in small bales, was $105 per ton, in large round bales, $75 to $80. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $135 to $138 per ton. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, few sales, were $127 to $128 per ton.

In the Platte Valley, good to supreme alfalfa, RFV 175 and up, in large square bales, was $125 to $135 per ton; good to premium, RFV 150 to 180, $100 to $110, in large round bales, $70 to $80; fair to good, $65 to $75; good to premium, in large round bales, ground and delivered to feedlots, $85 to $90; fair to good, in large round bales, ground and delivered to feedlots, $80 to $85. Oat-alfalfa hay, in large round bales, was $70 per ton. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $135 to $137 per ton.

In northwest Iowa, hay prices were steady. Demand continued good. Good to premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $120 to $145 per ton; good, $100 to $120, in large square bales, $80 to $87.50; good to premium, in large round bales, $82.50 to $92.50; fair to good, in large round bales, $75 to $85. Grass hay, in small bales, was $95 per ton, in large round bales, $63.50 to $82.50. Brome, in small bales, was $75 to $120 per ton, in large round bales, $70 to $75. Oat hay, in large round bales, was $57.50 per ton. Corn stalks, in small bales, were 80 cents per bale.

In southwest Minnesota, good alfalfa, in small bales, was $95 to $115 per ton; fair to good, $70 to $95; fair, in large square bales, $62.50 to $80; good to premium, in large round bales, $80 to $107.50; fair to good, $65 to $80; fair, $40 to $70. Grass hay, in small bales, was $70 to $75, in large round bales, $35 to $70.

In Montana, hay sales were very slow. Demand was moderate, as mild weather continued across the state.

Premium alfalfa, in large square bales, was $85 to $90 per ton or $105 to $110 delivered; good to premium, $85 to $90, delivered in from out of state, $90, in small bales for horses, $105 to $125; fair to good, $70 to $80; low to fair, $60 to $70. Premium alfalfa-grass hay, in small bales, was $105 per ton to horse interests; good, in large round bales, $90. Good to premium grass hay, in small bales, was $120 per ton. Premium timothy, in small bales, was $135 per ton for three-twine bales; good to premium, in large round bales, $80.

In Wyoming, western Nebraska and western South Dakota, trade continued slow. Prices were steady. Demand was moderate.

In eastern Wyoming, premium alfalfa was $85 to $95 per ton, for horses, $100 to $105, ground and delivered, $107. New crop dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $135 per ton wholesale.

In central and western Wyoming, alfalfa horse hay was $100 to $125 per ton; good to premium, $80 to $95. Alfalfa-timothy horse hay was $125 to $140 per ton. In southwestern and extreme western Wyoming, premium to supreme alfalfa was $120 to $135 per ton; good $100. Oat hay was $100 per ton. Alfalfa cubes, in the far west, were $130 per ton.

In western Nebraska, premium horse alfalfa was $100 to $110 per ton; good, $70 to $85; fair to good, ground and delivered, $90 to $95, some, $100. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 13% protein, less than 5 tons, were $164 retail, 5 to 12 tons, $146, 12 to 25 tons, $144, over 25 tons, $138.

In western South Dakota, premium alfalfa was $90 to $100 per ton; good, $70 to $90, in large round bales, $60 to $85, ground and delivered, $95. Dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 17% protein, were $165 per ton retail, $145 wholesale.

In Colorado, the hay trade was slow to moderate. Demand was good, as more typical late November weather entered the state. Remaining supplies of higher quality alfalfa and grass hay were becoming very tight. All classes and types of hay were fully steady, in limited trading.

In the northeast, supreme alfalfa was $110 to $120 per ton; premium, $100 to $105; good, $85 to $95, delivered, $100; fair, $70 to $80. Good alfalfa, ground and short haul to feedlots, was $100 to $105 per ton, some, to $110. Premium grass hay, in small bales, was $110 to $120 per ton, in large round and square bales, $95 to $100; good, in small bales, $95 to $100, in large round bales, $80. Oat hay, in large round bales, was mostly $65 to $70 per ton. Corn stalks, in large square bales, were $45 per ton, some, to $50.

In the southeast, supreme alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton, some, to $135; premium, $105 to $115; good, $95 to $100; fair, $80 to $85. Good alfalfa, ground and short haul to feedlots, was $105 to $110 per ton.

In the Mountain areas, premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $125 to $135 per ton, in large square bales, $105. Premium grass hay, in small bales, was $135 to $150 per ton; good, $120 to $125, in large round bales, $95 to $100. Premium grass-alfalfa hay, in small bales, was $130 to $150 per ton, in large square bales, $100 to $105.

On the Western Slope, premium alfalfa was $120 to $130 per ton, in large square bales, $100 to $110; good quality, in small bales, $110, in large square bales, $95. Premium grass hay, in small bales, was $130 to $145 per ton, in large square bales, $100. Premium grass-alfalfa hay, in small bales, was $130 to $135 per ton. Oat hay, in large round and square bales, was $70 per ton.

In the San Luis Valley, supreme quality alfalfa was $120 to $125 per ton, some, to $130; premium quality, $105 to $115; good, $90 to $100; fair, $80.

In the southwest, supreme alfalfa was $120 $130 per ton; premium, $110 to $115; good, $95 to $100; fair, $75 to $80. Premium grass-alfalfa hay was $110 to $120, in small lots, in small bales, to $130.

In Missouri, the pasture supply was declining. In the next few weeks, the hay market might start to see more trading. Winter might be just around the corner, and hay producers are ready to sell. There is very little buying or selling of hay. Prices on reported sales were steady. The Missouri Department of Agriculture hay hotline for buyers or sellers is 800-877-4429.

Supreme alfalfa was $135 to $150 per ton; premium, $110 to $135. Good quality brome was $85 to $110 per ton. Good quality mixed grass hay, in large round bales, was $25 to $30 per ton. Good quality timothy, in small bales, was $3 each. Fair quality fescue, in large round bales, was $10 to $20 per bale.

In Texas, much of the hay producing areas received badly needed rain, at the end of last week. North Texas and parts of the Panhandle received the most rainfall. This much-needed rainfall should hold grazing pastures at fair to good condition for the remainder of the month. Inventories in many counties should be adequate for winter usage. Hay movement was slow, as the wet weather hindered it. The Texas Department of Agriculture hay hot line for buyers and sellers is 877-429-1998.

In the Panhandle, premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $4 to $5 each in the field, or $5.50 to $6 each or $165 per ton delivered; fair to good, in large square bales, $155 delivered. Grinding alfalfa was $110 to $120 per ton delivered. Chopped alfalfa, delivered to feedlots was $118 to $128 in the north and $127 to $130 in the south, contracts, January to March, $128 delivered. Prairie hay, in small bales, was $130 per ton delivered. Milo hay, in big round bales, was $75 per ton delivered. Cane, in big round or square bales, was $75 to $80 per ton in the field, $85 delivered. Bluestem, in big square bales, was $50 per ton delivered. Peanut hay, few loads, was $60 per roll. Coastal bermuda hay, in small bales, was $4.50 each delivered.

In north, central and east Texas, premium alfalfa, in small bales, was $4.50 to $5.50 each at the barn, in large square bales, $160 to $165 per ton delivered; fair to good, in small bales, $3 each at the barn, in large round or square bales, $80 to $110 per ton in the field. Haygrazer, in small bales, was $2.75 to $3 each in the field, $3.25 to $4 each at the barn, in large round or square bales, $30 to $35 in the field. Coastal bermuda hay, in small bales, was $2.50 to $5 each in the field, few, $4 to $5.50 each delivered, in medium square or round bales, $25 to $35 per roll in the field, in big round bales, $45 to $60 per roll in the field.

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