The hay trade was slow to moderate, according to the June 19 Kansas Hay Market Report, compiled by the Federal-State USDA Market News Service, Dodge City, KS.

Demand was good for brome and dairy alfalfa; moderate for grinding alfalfa and prairie hay; and light for alfalfa pellets. Prices are from the most recent sales. Eastern Kansas producers were receiving showers and fighting high humidity trying to put up brome and alfalfa. However, most of the state's producers have had favorable weather for haying and wheat harvesting. Alfalfa producers were busy finishing the first cutting and starting the second. There should be some really good dairy quality alfalfa this cutting. Brome producers were happy with this year's crop, but it needs cut soon.

In southwest Kansas, dairy and grinding alfalfa were steady. Movement was slow to moderate. Horse quality alfalfa was $90 to $95 per ton. Supreme quality dairy alfalfa was $100 to $105 per ton; premium quality, RFV 160 to 180, $90 to $100. Fair to good quality grinding alfalfa, at the edge of the field, was $75 to $85 per ton, mostly $80; ground and short haul to feedlots, spot, $95 to $100. For the week ending June 9, 12,513 tons of alfalfa were ground and delivered to feedlots.

In south central Kansas, dairy and grinding alfalfa and alfalfa pellets were steady. Movement was moderate. Horse quality alfalfa was $90 to $95 per ton. Supreme quality dairy alfalfa was $100 to $105 per ton; premium quality, RFV 160 to 180, $80 to $100. Fair to good quality grinding alfalfa, at the edge of the field, $65 to $80 per ton, mostly $70 to $75; ground-on-the-truck, $80 to $90; new crop, ground and delivered, mostly $90 to $95. For the week ending June 9, 4,209 tons of alfalfa were ground and delivered to feedlots. Sun-cured alfalfa pellets, 15% protein, were $105 to $110 per ton; 17% protein, $118. Dehydrated alfalfa pellet, 17% protein, were $128.

In southeast Kansas, dairy alfalfa, prairie hay and brome were steady. Movement was slow. Premium quality dairy alfalfa was $80 to $90 per ton, instances, $100. Good quality alfalfa, in large round and medium square bales, was $85 per ton. Good quality bluestem, in small bales, scarce, was $75 to $85 per ton, in large round bales, $50. Good quality brome, in small bales, was $80 to $85 per ton, in large square bales, $70 to $75, in large round bales, $50 to $60.

In northwest Kansas, dairy and grinding alfalfa were steady. Movement was slow. Supreme quality dairy alfalfa, RFV 180+, was $100 to $105 per ton; premium quality, RFV 160 to 180, $90 to $95. Fair to good quality grinding alfalfa, at the edge of the field, was $70 to $80 per ton; ground-on-the-truck, $80 to $90.

In north central-northeast Kansas, dairy and grinding alfalfa, prairie hay and brome were steady. Movement was slow to moderate. Supreme quality dairy alfalfa, RFV 180 to 200, was $100 to $110 per ton, some, 58 cents per RFV point; premium quality, RFV 160 to 180, $90 to $100, some, 58 cents per RFV point; good, $80 to $85. Fair to good quality grinding alfalfa, at the edge of the field, was $70 to $75 per ton; ground-on-the-truck, $80 to $85. Good quality bluestem, in small bales, was $70 to $85 per ton, in large round bales, $50 to $60. Good quality brome, in small bales, was $60 to $85 per ton, in large round bales, $50 to $60.

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