Grain sorghum producers soon will have a new option to control insect pests.

At a recent seed industry field day, Novartis Crop Protection showcased Adage, a new seed treatment insecticide for sorghum.

Novartis anticipates that Adage will be registered for use later this year as a seed treatment insecticide for the 2001 sorghum planting season. It is considered to be a significant organo-phosphate replacement by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and is under expedited review.

"Adage is effective against all major sorghum pests, including: chinch bug, aphids, greenbugs and wireworms. Its high degree of water solubility enables it to work under all environmental conditions. That gives it an edge over competing products--especially in dry conditions," reports Mark Jirak, seed treatment crop manager for Novartis.

The field day featured sorghum plots planted with Adage-treated seed representing nine major seed companies. The Adage plots demonstrated superior stand establishment and exceptionally strong plant vigor.

In addition, Adage shows excellent compatibility, performance and seed safety when applied with the fungicides Maxim and Apron XL, and herbicide antidote Concept III on sorghum by the sorghum seed company. An added benefit is a reduced seed loading rate, which means less active ingredient applied per seed, compared to currently registered products.

Novartis internal and seed company trials confirm that the combination of Adage, Maxim, Apron XL and Concep III are safer to the seed than the currently available competitive products.

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