American Angus Association members and affiliates now have the option to electronically store their animals" registration certificates. The new procedure will allow more flexibility when transferring papers and will eliminate the typical "paper shuffle" that some cattle breeders experience.

Electronic storage will give producers the option to electronically transfer papers, with no mail time or postage cost. Breeders have the convenience of accessing the herd information 24 hours a day, seven days a week at AAA log in at www.angus.org.

"The option of electronic storage offers added convenience to our members," says Bryce Schumann, director of member services for the Association. "Electronic storage will not change the registration process or the authenticity of the papers. It just simplifies the process and gives producers more options."

From June 1 to Sept. 30, members can chose the electronic storage feature free of charge to store the paper registration certificates of existing registered Angus cattle. After September 30, printed registration papers that are electronically stored will be assessed a $2 correction fee.

Producers can request a printed copy of an electronically stored registration paper at no charge. Members who participate in Angus shows will still need to provide original registration papers at check-in.

The American Angus Association, with headquarters in St. Joseph, Mo., provides services to more than 34,000 members and thousands of affiliates nationwide. For more information about the Angus breed go to www.angus.org.

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