Kansas FFA Association

Leadership School

Purpose

To encourage students to learn to effectively participate in a business meeting and to help in the development of their leadership skills.

Objectives

Students will be able to

  1. Use parliamentary procedure to conduct an orderly and efficient meeting.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of parliamentary law.
  3. Present logical, realistic and convincing discussion.
  4. Record complete and accurate minutes.

Rules

  1. A team representing a chapter at state CDE's will consist of six members and two designated alternates. The alternates are not permitted to observe competing teams, but may observe their own team. The alternates may replace a regular team member before the start of the CDE.
  2. The CDE will have four phases: written examination, a ten minute team presentation of parliamentary procedure, oral questions following the presentation, and minutes prepared by the team secretary in consultation with the team chair.
  3. Contestants must appear in official FFA dress during all rounds of the CDE
  4. The advisor shall not consult with the team after the CDE begins.
  5. All contestants must bring their own pencils (a minimum of two No. 2 pencils).

Format

Presentation (750 points)

  1. Each team will address a local chapter item of business, which would normally be a part of a chapter's Program of Activities (e.g. Food for America, Project PALS, WEA, fundraisers, recreation, etc.) Consult the Official FFA Manual and Student Handbook for specific activities. The motion will be specific and must be moved as it is written on the card.
  2. The team demonstrating shall assume that a regular chapter meeting is in progress and the chair shall start the presentation by saying, "Is there any new business that should be presented at this time?" A team member will then move the main motion assigned to the team.
  3. The event official will assign the main motion on a 3"x 5" card. This is to be the first item of business presented. All teams in each session will use the same main motion. It is suggested that this main motion should be the first motion presented, unless orders of the day, take from the table, reconsider or rescind are required.
  4. The event officials will select two subsidiary, two incidental and one privileged or unclassified motion from the list of permissible motions. These motions will be on a 3"x5" card and one will be randomly assigned to each team member. All teams in each session will be assigned the same motions. Team members will have one minute to review the main motion, the motions to be demonstrated and to identify his/her motion (which may be noted by bolding, underlining or highlighting). Members may not confer during the one-minute time period.
  5. There shall be no limitation to the number of subsidiary, incidental, privileged and unclassified motions demonstrated except that the team must demonstrate two subsidiary, two incidental and one privileged or unclassified motions designated by the officials in charge. The team may use more than one main motion as long as it pertains to the assigned main motion. While acceptable, this practice is strongly discouraged.
  6. An alternate main motion not pertaining to the main motion may be used to facilitate the correct demonstration of the motion, "Call for the orders of the day," should that privileged motion be designated as one to be demonstrated by the officials in charge.
  7. If the officials in charge designate "rescind, reconsider or take from the table", as a motion to be demonstrated, you could assume that you would rescind an action taken, which cannot be reconsidered, or take from the table a motion or reconsider a motion you did earlier in the present meeting. Example: I move to rescind the motion that was passed at our last meeting about having an FFA hayride." These motions shall not be used unless they are a required motion. Unrealistic or canned debate on rescind or reconsider may be penalized at the judges discretion.
  8. The top four debates per member will be tabulated in the presentation score. No more than two debates per member per motion will be tabulated.
  9. A member's required motion will not be counted as an additional motion for another member. The person who makes the assigned main motion will be given credit for an additional motion (20 pts). Credit for an additional motion will only be given one time (Example: Division of the Assembly can only be used once for credit). If an alternative main motion is used, the member will be given credit for an additional motion.
  10. A team shall be allowed 10 minutes in which to demonstrate knowledge of parliamentary law. Thirty (30) seconds past 10 minutes will be allowed without penalty. A deduction of 50 points will be made for every additional 30 seconds or major fraction thereof. A timekeeper will furnish the time used by each team at the close of the event.
    • Minutes Points Deducted
      • 10:00 - 10:30 0
      • 10:31 - 11:00 50
      • 11:01 - 11:30 100
      • 11:31 - 12:00 150
      • 12:01 - 12:30 200
      • 12:31 - 13:00 25

Oral Questions (100 points)

Each of the six-team members will be asked a planned question relating to their assigned motion. No one may step forward to help correct answers on the first six questions at any time. Following these six questions, the judges will have two additional minutes to ask questions for clarification of the presentation, after which, time will be called.

Presentation Minutes (50 points)

Each team will have a secretary take minutes of the presentation. A possible score of 50 points will be allowed for the minutes. Pencils and paper will be supplied to take notes during the presentation. Following the presentation, the secretary in consultation with the chair, will have thirty minutes to prepare the official minutes. Notes taken by the Secretary during the presentation must be turned in with the official copy of the minutes on Form 1. (The lowest possible score for the section is zero (0).) Event officials shall use Form 3 to score the official minutes of the presentation.

Instructions on Minutes

  1. Use the example of proper minutes as illustrated in the Official FFA Secretary's Book and/or outlined in Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised.
  2. A dictionary will be permitted for writing the official minutes of the presentation.
  3. The minutes will begin by recording the first item of business presented. Opening ceremonies and other preliminary information will not be used. Example: It was moved by John Smith and seconded by Jill Jones to start the Food For America program on December 1.
  4. The chair and the secretary may consult in preparing the official minutes of the presentation. A total of 30 minutes will be allowed to prepare the minutes. A judge will read, review and grade the official minutes of the presentation after completion of each round of the event. The scores will be provided to the presentation judges for use in computing final scores.

Individual Activity -Written Test (100 points)

A written test will consist of 25 objective-type multiple choice questions covering basic parliamentary law and information pertaining to minutes. Thirty minutes will be allowed to complete the test. Each participant may score a maximum of 100 points. Alternates do not take the written test. The average score of the six-team members will be used to compute the total team score in each round.

Guidelines for Scoring Discussion

  1. It is essential that each judge observes and maintains consistent criteria in scoring discussions for the duration of the event
  2. Judges must overlook personal opinions and beliefs and score discussion in an unbiased manner. All discussion should be scored at the time it is delivered.
  3. Characteristics of effective discussion include
    • completeness of thought
    • logical reasoning
    • clear statement of speaker's position
    • conviction of delivery
    • concise and effective statement of discussion.
  4. A suggested grading scale is as follows:
    • Excellent: 16-20 points
    • Good: 11-15 points
    • Average: 6-10 points
    • Poor: 0-5 points
  5. An excellent discussion would be extremely unusual and would be characterized by a truly stirring delivery and brilliant in terms of information provided and/or suggestions for action offered. Poor discussion would be characterized by a lack of effective delivery, poor grammar, reasoning and substance. An example might be: "I think this is a good idea."
  6. Most discussion would fall in the range of 8-15 points. An example of a discussion might be: "I think this is a very significant motion which should be passed for the following reasons (new, informative and logically related)." Each debate should have a logical conclusion. Good discussion would be characterized by effective delivery, substance, creative and visionary thought delivered in a convincing and compelling manner.
  7. Each time a participant in the presentation discusses any motion, they may earn a score. However, an individual may never earn more than 60 points in a given presentation. Furthermore, no more than 20 points may be earned during one recognition by the chair.
  8. The top four debates per member will be tabulated in the presentation score. No more than two debates per member per motion will be tabulated.
    Guidelines for Scoring the Chair
  9. Ability to preside - handling of motions, keeping members informed, use of the gavel, distribution of discussion. (80 points)
  10. Leadership - stage presence, poise, self-confidence, politeness and voice. (20 points)

Tiebreakers

Tiebreakers for teams will be:

  1. the total presentation score
  2. the team's average score on the written test
  3. the total score for questions.

General Plan

Each of the seven District FFA Leadership Schools in Kansas will conduct a Ritual/Parliamentary Procedure CDE and select a winning team from among the chapters present at the fall leadership training conferences. The first and second place teams in each district will be eligible to compete against the other district winners in the semifinals at the next State Convention.

Eligibility

  1. A team shall be composed of the six chapter representatives. Any changes from this ruling shall have the approval of the chairperson of this CDE.
  2. FFA chapters and members must be in "good standing" with the State and National organization in order to be eligible for the State CDE.
  3. There is no limit as to the number of years an individual may participate on both the District and State levels regardless of the placing at either level.

Recommended References

The official text will be the latest edition of Robert's Rules of Order published by The Scott, Foresman and Company, 1900 East A Street, Glenn View, IL 60025, 1-300/782-2665.

Additional references may include the FFA New Horizons magazine, the Official FFA Manual, the FFA Student Handbook, and the Official Chapter Secretary's Book.

Awards

State - 1st through 4th place receive a plaque.

District-

District Leadership Schools

  1. Will consist of three areas, (1) Ritual; (2) Parliamentary Procedure; and (3) Information CDE. Rank of each area will be added with parliamentary procedure being counted twice to obtain an overall rank. The low score would, therefore, rank the highest. In case of a tie(s), the parliamentary procedure area will be the tiebreaker.
  2. Overall winners are determined by a rank order of the three areas.
  3. The winning parliamentary team will compete in the state CDE during the State FFA Convention.
  4. The Information Quiz will consist of 100 questions. They will be of true/false, matching and/or multiple-choice type questions. It is considered a State CDE. Results will appear in the Kansas FFA'er. Forty minutes will be allowed for participants to complete the test.

*Questions will come from information in the Official FFA Manual; FFA New Horizons ; and the FFA Student Handbook.

Parliamentary Opinion on Use of Gavel During FFA Parliamentary Procedure Events- Dr. James J. Connors (Superintendent National FFA Parliamentary Procedure CDE)
December 7, 2001

I have been asked by the Kansas FFA to render a parliamentary opinion concerning the proper use of the gavel during FFA parliamentary procedure competitive events. Guidelines for using the gavel are not currently included in the written rules for the National FFA Parliamentary Procedure Career Development Events.

Evidence:

In researching the proper use of the gavel I have found the following references.

  1. 1. Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised (10th edition, 2000), the current parliamentary authority and primary reference for the National FFA Parliamentary Procedure CDE, includes the following statements:
    • If such a motion is adopted, the chair announces the result as follows: Chair: The ayes have it and the meeting stands recessed [or "in recess"] for fifteen minutes [rapping once with the gavel if desired] (p. 225)
    • The adjournment may be signaled by a single rap of the gavel if desired. (p. 234)
    • The chair simply raps lightly [for breaches of conduct] (p. 626)
  2. The National FFA Manual (1999, p. 23) and the FFA Student Handbook (2000, p. 55-56) both include the following rules for the use of the gavel.
    • All officers and members should understand the use and meaning of the gavel. It is the symbol of authority and, used correctly, ensures orderly meetings.
    • One tap follows the announcement of adjournment, the completion of a business item, or is a message to the members to be seated following the opening ceremony.
    • Two taps of the gavel calls the meeting to order.
    • Three taps of the gavel is the signal for all members to stand in unison on the third tap.
    • A series of sharp taps is used to restore order at a meeting. For instance, if discussion ventures away from the main motion and attention needs to be brought back to the matter at hand, the chairman should rap the gavel a number of times to get the group's attention.

Decision:

Based on the evidence outlined above, and discussions with experienced national parliamentary procedure judges, I have concluded the following:

  1. Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised (10th edition, 2000) and the FFA guidelines for the use of the gavel (FFA Manual and Student Handbook) are in agreement on the use of the gavel to announce the results of a vote (recess), and adjournment. The guidelines differ in the use of the gavel for breaches of conduct.
  2. The use of the gavel guidelines that appear in both the FFA Manual and FFA Student Handbook have the effect of established custom. Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised states: "In some organizations a particular practice may sometimes come to be followed as a matter of established custom so that it is treated practically as if it were prescribed by a rule of order" (RONR, 2000, p. 17, ln 4-7).
  3. The use of the gavel guidelines would therefore be treated as a "standing rule" of the National FFA Parliamentary Procedure CDE.>
  4. Therefore, I conclude that the proper use of the gavel during FFA parliamentary procedure competitive events should be:
    • One tap follows the announcement of adjournment, the completion of a business item, or is a message to the members to be seated following their entrance to the event.
    • Two taps of the gavel calls the meeting to order [if event includes the start of the meeting].
    • Three taps of the gavel is the signal for all members to stand in unison on the third tap [to be used if questions are asked by judges at the end of the demonstration].
    • A series of sharp taps is used to restore order during the event.