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ISSUE DATE: 04/28/2014

No-till canola depends on residue management

By Doug Rich

Canola can be part of a successful no-till rotation, but wheat stubble must be managed properly to prevent winterkill. Producers are still searching for the best ways to manage wheat stubble in no-till canola.

The problem with planting no-till canola into wheat stubble has been winterkill, not stand establishment. Plant emergence has been similar for no-till and conventional seeding. Winter survival with no-till canola into wheat stubble is affected by seed placement and residue thickness, crown height of canola plants going into winter dormancy, soil temperatures in the fall and soil bulk density. Winter survival will decrease 10 percent to 20 percent in no-till canola fields where the stubble is not removed or burned.

“Canola allowed us to go into a no-till program,” said Jay Leeper, a producer from Dacoma, Okla.

Leeper and his brother, Lee, started growing canola in 2006, the same year they started no-till farming. Lee Leeper said it is too dry and harsh in their part of the country for soybeans to work most of the time. Corn can stand a lot of dry weather but not the hot, dry wind.

In 2006 they planted 400 acres of canola and it all froze out. Laughing about their first experience with canola, Leeper said it worked so well they tried it again the next year.

“Our crop rotation is a little different from most,” Lee Leeper said.


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Secretary Vilsack appoints new members to USDA NAREEE advisory board
Undersecretary Scuse promotes disaster assistance programs
UNL's Rural Poll to be accompanied this year by Metro Poll from UNO
USDA helps open and expand export markets for U.S. agriculture
Workshop to focus on pond management
World's Largest Truck Convoy preparing to roll through southwest Kansas

CROPS

ASTA testifies before House Appropriations Subcommittee on effective native seed use
Back-to-back grain grading workshops set May 6 to 7 in Amarillo
Bees aren't the only pollinators that are busy
Biofuel production declines
Cool weather slows weed burndown
Corn planting on target
Deadline approaching for Kansas teachers to attend summer institute
Diverse groups tell EPA to keep biofuels on track
Freeze puts large acreages of Texas wheat at risk of freeze injury
Grain sorghum residue has value as livestock feed
Growers ask questions about tannins and tillers
Industrial hemp registration ends May 1
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K-State Research and Extension plans events
Manage nitrogen to prevent lodging
NAWG seeks summer intern
New software helps farmers manage nutrients
No-till canola depends on residue management
NRCS accepts grant applications for conservation innovation efforts
Planting date affects corn and soybean yields
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Sample Nebraska's finest wines at Toast Nebraska
SDSU undergraduate earns plant science fellowship for soybean research
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Texas A&M AgriLife spring field day set May 14 at Chillicothe
USDA offers specialty crop block grants
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WGRC and Kansas Wheat partnership prospers
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EDITOR

Cows caught in climate change debate
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COLUMNS

Agriculture teachers touch young lives
Dairy efficiency program started
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MARKETS

Cooler temps with frost, freeze warnings Missouri
Cooler temps with frost, freeze warnings Missouri
Corn, wheat close higher
Dodge City livestock auction report
Drier conditions allow planting progress Colorado
Dry conditions remain Texas
Freezing nights, wet fields delay spring planting Montana
Freezing temps give way to warm by week's end Kansas
Georgia livestock auction summary
Grain market close
More precipitation in central, southwest parts of state Arkansas
Most states have moderate trade activity
OKC West livestock sales report
Pratt 3 p.m. cattle sales report
Pratt 3 p.m. cattle sales report
Pratt livestock auction report
Producers busy planting Wyoming
Rain, cool temps slow fieldwork Iowa
Record breaking cold Oklahoma
Salina livestock auction report
Snow limits fieldwork Minnesota
Some freeze damage reported New Mexico
Springfield dairy heifer sales report
Trade, movement slow to moderate
Very little precipitation received South Dakota
Warmer conditions finish week Nebraska

RANGE

2014 Colorado Leopold Conservation Award recipient announced
Alfalfa's benefits to livestock, soil worth the work
Nebraska Youth Range Camp planned
Nontoxic fescue varieties ready to use
Nontoxic fescue varieties ready to use

FAMILY

12 FFA collegiate members to travel to Japan in May, explore global agriculture
4-H chick project hatches interest in science
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CDA offers information about controlling Emerald Ash Borers, hiring commercial pesticide application
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Let them eat cake!
Meditation
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Santa Fe County Master Gardeners to host 10th annual garden fair
Saving the lesser prairie-chicken: What landowners should know
Spending less on food

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