0324UnmannedAerialVehiclessr.cfm Commercial agriculture may be the largest beneficiary of unmanned aerial vehicles
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways


Reader Comment:
by Wheat_Harvest movie

"Thanks so much for the article! These are the types of people we hope to"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Commercial agriculture may be the largest beneficiary of unmanned aerial vehicles


For centuries, farmers have braved the elements to walk their land to check for problems ranging from wind damage and calving cows to pests and predators.

Unmanned aerial vehicles, which some people refer to as drones, may save farmers time and money with bird’s-eye views of farmland, says Bob Schultheis, a natural resource engineering specialist with University of Missouri Extension in Webster County.

Schultheis addressed the use of UAVs on the farm during the Greene County Soils and Crops Conference March 18 at the Springfield Livestock Marketing Center.

UAVs suited for farm applications vary widely in cost and size. Entry-level aircraft cost $500 to $1,500 and can fly for 10 to 20 minutes without recharging batteries. Most weigh less than 5 pounds, have a wingspan of less than 3 feet and travel under 30 mph. For about $300, farmers can install cameras in drones that can send clear still or video images to a smartphone.

UAVs can provide information to answer questions like: How bad was last night’s hail storm? Are all of my cows on the north 40? Does my corn need more nitrogen?

Most UAVs rely on GPS for navigation. Entry-level systems can be guided by a handheld remote control. More sophisticated vehicles can be programmed to fly designated routes using GPS and GIS technology.

“The uses are as varied as Missouri farmland. Entomologists may find the devices especially helpful for scouting of pests. UAVs can collect information on plants that have grown to heights that make it difficult to walk through narrow rows,” said Schultheis.

Farmers could even use the unmanned devices to document conditions when applying for government programs such as crop insurance.

“While much of the recent media attention has centered on unmanned aircraft as a way to deliver packages, commercial agriculture may be the largest beneficiary of UAV technology,” said Schultheis.

UAV technology has raised concerns about privacy issues, but UAVs used in agriculture likely are less controversial than those used for commercial applications. Currently, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) does not allow UAV use for commercial purposes. Farmers must follow FAA guidelines for hobbyists.

Unmanned aircraft are restricted to airspace no higher than 400 feet. If flights occur within 3 miles of an airport, airport officials must be notified. Recent information suggests producers are permitted to fly over areas they farm, but have to be careful about taking photos or video past their property lines.

In 2012, Congress directed the FAA to grant unmanned aircraft access to U.S. skies by 2015. The FAA has released a “road map” for potential UAVuse and six federally designated test sites have been approved.

For 100 years, MU Extension has engaged Missourians in relevant programs based on University of Missouri research. The year 2014 marks the centennial of the Smith-Lever Act, which formalized the Cooperative Agricultural Extension Service, a national network whose purpose is to extend university-based knowledge beyond the campus.

University of Missouri Extension programs focus on the high-priority needs of Missourians. Each county extension center, with oversight by locally elected and appointed citizens, is your local link to practical education on almost anything. More information on this topic is available online at http://extension.missouri.edu.

Date: 4/7/2014



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search



Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives