Malatya Haber Trich cases reported in 2 Colorado counties
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Trich cases reported in 2 Colorado counties

The Colorado Department of Agriculture reminds cattle owners to test their herd for bovine trichomoniasis.

As of July 22, there are currently two positive trich locations in two Colorado counties: Park and Archuleta.

So far this year there have been six trich cases in five counties: Park, La Plata, Costilla, Las Animas and Archuleta.

A map detailing trichomoniasis sample submissions by county and the prevalence for trichomoniasis-positive counties can be found at www.colorado.gov/ag.

“Testing and monitoring herds for trichomoniasis is the best method of controlling this infection,” said State Veterinarian, Dr. Keith Roehr. “Cattle owners should talk to their veterinarian to determine the best management practices for their herd.”

“Trich” is a costly, yet preventable, infection that can affect dairy and beef cattle. If bulls become infected, the percentage of open cows can increase from 5 to 30 percent.

Trich is a venereal disease of cattle caused by Trichomonas foetus. The T. foetus infection causes fertility problems, such as early embryonic death or abortion of the calf, and is asymptomatic in bulls.

Colorado trich regulations require all non-virgin bulls changing ownership or being transported into Colorado be tested for T. foetus unless the animal is going to slaughter. Bulls on public land grazing permits or with grazing associations must also be tested prior to turn-out.

Several diagnostic laboratories across the state offer trich testing; samples must be taken by an accredited veterinarian and results will be available between four to six days. For testing locations, visit www.colorado.gov/ag/animals and click on “Livestock Health.”

Date: 9/02/2013



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