0923FeedstockFlexibilityProgramsr.cfm USDA solicits additional bids under the Feedstock Flexibility Program
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USDA solicits additional bids under the Feedstock Flexibility Program

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The Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced another iteration of the Feedstock Flexibility Program. These invitations are subsequent to the first series of invitations issued Aug. 15.

Congress created FFP in the 2008 farm bill, which requires the purchase of sugar as a feedstock for producing fuel-grade ethanol and other biofuels. The program is designed to avoid forfeiture of sugar pledged as collateral by processors that secure nonrecourse commodity loans from CCC. This iteration of the FFP is different from the earlier version in that sugarcane and sugar beet processors are encouraged to submit their offer jointly with the bioenergy producer.

The Farm Service Agency’s invitation for U.S. sugar processors to sell sugar to CCC, and the invitation for bioenergy producers to buy sugar under FFP for bioenergy production, can be found on the FSA Commodity Operations website at www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=coop&topic=landing.

For further background on FFP and other sugar programs administered by USDA’s Farm Service Agency, go online to www.fsa.usda.gov.

Date: 10/7/2013



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