Malatya Haber Manage calves to reduce stress at weaning, improve performance
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal
Commerical Hay Equipment For The Farm
Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizer



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways




Reader Comment:
by jJane

"Thanks for sharing this story!"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Manage calves to reduce stress at weaning, improve performance

This is the time of year when many cow-calf producers are weaning calves. The following are some important factors and strategies to remember when planning to wean calves, courtesy of University of Nebraska Extension.

Stress is the No. 1 issue that affects calf performance at weaning. Calves are being removed from their dams and a herd social structure in which they were comfortable. Plus, the calves are often being moved into different environment with new feed and water sources. As one rancher once put it, it is kind of like putting a bunch of junior high kids into a hotel room by themselves without a chaperone and telling them to figure life out. The following are things that can be done to reduce stress at weaning, helping calves stay healthy and adjust to their new environment.

Have a good herd health program plan

Having a good herd health program plan can help to reduce sickness at weaning, improve the treatment response of those calves that do get sick and increase the overall performance of calves during weaning. Precondition calves prior to weaning. Work with your veterinarian to plan vaccination strategies and treatment protocols.

In certain parts of the country, strategic mineral supplementation when the calves are with their dams prior to weaning may be beneficial for getting good immune response. Minerals such as copper, zinc, cobalt and manganese are important to immune system function. A lack of these minerals in feed sources or high levels of other minerals such as sulfur which can inhibit absorption of minerals can impact immune response.

Introduce new feeds

Introducing new feeds to calves while they are with their dams prior to weaning can help calves start on feed more quickly when they are weaned. Feedstuffs should be palatable with minimal fines and dust. Feeds should be evaluated to determine if they have adequate levels of protein and energy to meet desired performance goals.

Consider a two-step weaning process

Fence-line weaning calves or placing nose weaners into calves four to seven days before removal from their dams are a couple of methods to accomplish this. Both of these methods prevent the calves from nursing while still giving the calf social contact with its dam. This gradual process appears to help the calves forget about nursing and begin the transition to being on their own and part of a new herd.

Ideally, fence-line weaning should be in an environment that allows both cows and calves to spread out along the fence, has minimal dust present and provides feed and water resources for the calves that are familiar and close to the fence.

Consider supplementing calves while they are still with their dams beginning two weeks before fence-line weaning.

Leave calves in the pasture they are used to being in and move cows to the adjacent pasture.

A number of studies have shown calves that were fence-line weaned have lower incidents of sickness compared to their contemporaries that were hard weaned and immediately separated from visual and audio contact with their dams.

Early Weaning Health Considerations for Calves (http://beef.unl.edu/web/beef/earlyweaninghealth) and Nutrition and Management for Early Weaned Calves (http://beef.unl.edu/web/beef/feedingearlyweanedcalves) are two webinars that further address some of the management practices presented here.

Date: 10/7/2013



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search


Advertisement
NCBA Convention

United Sorghum Checkoff Program

Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives