0403NationalSoyfoodsMonthsr.cfm Malatya Haber Add soyfoods to family's diet
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Add soyfoods to family's diet

During April, National Soyfoods Month, Kansas soybean farmers encourage their neighbors to explore new ways to incorporate healthy soyfoods into their families’ balanced diets alongside soy-fed beef, pork, poultry and dairy products.

“Soyfoods are a convenient, nutritious choice,” said Charlene Patton, a Topeka-based home economist who serves as the consumer-media specialist for the Kansas Soybean Commission. “Soy is the only plant-based complete protein, and it is cholesterol-free and low in saturated fat.”

“Soyfoods are easy to prepare and simple to incorporate into your favorite dishes, making them a healthy selection for busy families year-round,” she added.

Patton has posted more than 300 soyfoods recipes at http://www.KansasSoybeans.org. They include appetizers, snack foods, beverages, breads, children’s recipes, desserts, holiday recipes, entrees, salads and more.

Other recipes, lunchbox ideas and help finding soyfoods in your local grocery store are available at http://www.SoyfoodsMonth.org.

“While National Soyfoods Month primarily is about consuming soy oil and protein in whole soybeans or soy-based foods, it also is a great opportunity to remind people that animal agriculture is the largest ‘processor’ of soybeans. In fact, poultry and livestock consume the vast majority of the soybean meal produced in this country,” Patton said. “That is why the soy checkoff encourages consumer choices toward a balanced diet, funds research to improve both soyfoods and soybean meal, and supports programs in animal agriculture.”

The Kansas Soybean Commission, headquartered in Topeka, includes nine volunteer farmer-commissioners who are elected by their peers. They oversee investments of the legislated “soybean checkoff” assessment in research, consumer information, market development, industry relations and farmer outreach to improve the profitability of all Kansas soybean farmers.

Date: 5/6/2013



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