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USDA releases feedlot 2011 Parts I and II reports

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has released the first two descriptive reports from its Feedlot 2011 study: Part I: Management Practices on U.S. Feedlots with a Capacity of 1,000 or More Head and Part II: Management Practices on U.S. Feedlots with a Capacity of Fewer than 1,000 Head. The reports were produced by APHIS’s National Animal Health Monitoring System.

The NAHMS Feedlot 2011 study took an in-depth look at large U.S. feedlots (1,000 or more head capacity) in 12 states and small feedlots (fewer than 1,000 head capacity) in 13 states. Large feedlots accounted for 82.1 percent of the Jan. 1, 2011, inventory in all U.S. feedlots but only 2.8 percent of all feedlots. The 12 participating states accounted for over 95 percent of the inventory in large feedlots. Small feedlots accounted for 16.0 percent of the Jan. 1, 2011, inventory in all U.S. feedlots but 92.9 percent of all feedlots.

The 13 states accounted for 85.4 percent of U.S. farms with fewer than 500 cattle on feed and 90.5 percent of the inventory on farms with fewer than 500 cattle on feed.

Here are a few highlights from the Feedlot 2011 Part I report:

More than 70 percent of feedlot operators on feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 head or more believed that pre-arrival processing practices were very or extremely effective in reducing cattle sickness and death loss in feedlots.

The most frequent management practices used as part of an initial processing were vaccination for respiratory disease (96.0 percent of those processing) and treatment for parasites (94.5 percent of those processing).

Overall, 73.4 percent of feedlots with a capacity of 1,000 or more head used some antibiotics in feed for some of their animals. For 66.9 percent of feedlots, the average period of inclusion of antibiotics in feed was from 1 to 7 days.

Here are a few highlights from the Feedlot 2011 Part II report:

The majority of feedlots with a capacity of fewer than 1,000 head (77.0 percent) placed only beef breed or cross-breed cattle. Most of the animals placed in these feedlots (76 percent) were less than 700 pounds at placement.

Most of the cattle shipments leaving feedlots with a capacity of fewer than 1,000 head (67.3 percent) went directly to slaughter. However, 32.2 percent of shipments went to a sales/auction facility.

Approximately half of operators on feedlots with a capacity of fewer than 1,000 head (51.6 percent) were somewhat familiar or very familiar with the Beef Quality Assurance Program. Only 29 percent were not at all familiar with the program.

For more information, visit http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahms/feedlot/.

Date: 5/20/2013



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