0610_SDcropreportMR_ko.cfm Wet, cool conditions limit fieldwork
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways


Reader Comment:
by Greater Franklin County

"Thanks for picking up the story about our Buy One Product Local campaign --- we're"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Wet, cool conditions limit fieldwork


For the week ending June 9, wet and cool conditions continued again this week limiting fieldwork, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, South Dakota Field Office, June 10.

Statewide, there were 4.2 days suitable for fieldwork. The cool conditions also slowed crop growth and development.

Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 5 short, 79 adequate, and 16 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 2 percent very short, 20 short, 73 adequate, and 5 surplus. Hay and pasture supplies saw improvement with the recent precipitation, but could use some warm temperatures. Major farm activities included spraying for weeds and fertilizer applications.

Winter wheat jointed was at 65 percent. Winter wheat headed showed little progress at 8 percent, behind 95 percent last year and 49 percent average. Condition rated 37 percent very poor, 19 percent poor, 32 percent fair, 12 percent good, and 0 percent excellent.

Spring wheat jointed was at 29 percent, behind 2012 at 91 percent and 39 percent average. Headed was at 13 percent, also behind last year at 50 percent, but equal to 13 percent average. Condition rated 2 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 35 percent fair, 48 percent good, and 11 percent excellent.

Oats were 41 percent jointed, behind 91 percent last year but ahead of 39 percent average. Headed was at 7 percent, behind last year at 44 percent and 12 percent average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 57 percent good, and 10 percent excellent.

Barley was 100 percent emerged, equal to 100 percent for 2012 and ahead of 94 percent average. Jointed was at 7 percent, well behind last year at 81 percent and 27 percent average. Headed was at 1 percent, also behind last year at 11 percent and 5 percent average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 percent poor, 31 percent fair, 66 percent good, and 2 percent excellent.

Corn was 91 percent emerged, behind last year at 99 percent but ahead of 85 percent average. Condition rated 1 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 21 percent fair, 63 percent good, and 11 percent excellent.

Soybean planting advanced another 19 percentage points and is 82 percent complete, behind last year at 98 percent and near 85 percent average. Emerged was at 47 percent, behind last year at 86 percent and 53 percent average.

Sorghum planted was 77 percent complete, behind 2012 at 84 percent and ahead of 72 percent average. Emerged was at 17 percent, behind 2012 at 62 percent and 34 percent average.

Sunflowers planted were at 20 percent, behind last year at 67 percent and 46 percent average.

The first cutting of alfalfa was 5 percent complete, behind 2012 at 54 percent and 27 percent average. Alfalfa hay condition rated 1 percent very poor, 3 percent poor, 32 percent fair, 58 percent good, and 6 percent excellent.

Ninety percent of cattle were reported as moved to pasture compared to 84 percent the week before. Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 11 percent poor, 30 percent fair, 47 percent good, and 11 percent excellent. Hay and forage supplies rated 23 percent very short, 23 percent short, 52 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus.

Date: 6/17/2013



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search



Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives