0627ManagingCornRootwormsr.cfm Management options for corn rootworm
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Management options for corn rootworm

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While there are traits and products to help you protect your corn crops against corn rootworm, you still need to manage against the pest and that means knowing about larvae and adult beetle populations in your fields. According to experts from DuPont Pioneer, scouting to keep tabs on those populations is essential to protecting your corn crop against rootworm damage.

“Wet soils and cooler temps challenged the growth of corn early this year. These conditions may have also controlled early-hatching larvae by reducing their food source and saturating the soils,” says Clint Pilcher, DuPont Pioneer insect resistance management expert. “Regardless, growers should still scout their fields to check on the effectiveness of their control program and plan accordingly if they have severe problems.”

The goal is to break the rootworm cycle and manage the population. Options for corn rootworm include rotating crops, alternating traits or stacks within planted corn hybrids, enhancing control with insecticide seed treatments and soil-applied insecticides, or spraying adult beetles during silking.

In-season scouting

Adult beetles impact grain fill by chewing off the green silks, causing spotty pollination later in the season. The larval stage, however, is the most damaging and impacts yield by feeding on corn roots. One way to determine the current level of rootworm pressure and the potential for future threats is to scout your fields for adult beetles in July and August. Scouting helps determine whether to spray the current crop and limit the potential for population outbreaks the next crop season. When scouting, look for lodged plants with heavy damage on the root system.

To ensure that spraying rootworm beetles will pay off, determine that the critical population threshold has been met before using an insecticide. This guideline is location specific, so consult your local agronomist for corn rootworm beetle threshold levels in your area. If the threshold is met, apply timely foliar insecticides to control the egg-laying adult population.

Planning for next year

After following these recommendations, it’s important to begin thinking ahead about controlling corn rootworm for the next crop, which includes following programs that preserve corn rootworm control traits for the long term.

“The best thing growers can do to help eliminate rootworm pressure is to rotate to another crop, such as soybeans,” Pilcher states. “Corn rootworms love corn-on-corn, so anything growers can do to break that cycle is best.”

If there is no opportunity to rotate a field to another crop, consider a product with multiple modes of action in corn rootworm-resistant traits.

If using a blended, in-bag refuge product is not an option for you then a structured refuge is required in combination with certain Bt-rootworm products. Practicing good stewardship like planting a refuge is vital in helping maintain a population of corn pests that are susceptible to resistance traits. In the long-term this will help preserve the viability of insect protection for in-plant traits.

When it comes to keeping insect control solutions for years to come, rotating products or crops are the best options.

Date: 7/15/2013



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