Malatya Haber Oklahoma horse owners should take precautions against West Nile
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal
Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizer



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways


Reader Comment:
by Wheat_Harvest movie

"Thanks so much for the article! These are the types of people we hope to"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Oklahoma horse owners should take precautions against West Nile

Advertisement

The Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry is encouraging horse owners to take precautions and vaccinate their animals to protect against the West Nile virus. In Oklahoma this year, three horses have been positively diagnosed as infected with WNV. The bird population serves as the reservoir for the virus, and it is then spread by mosquitoes to horses and humans.

The mosquitoes most likely to transmit West Nile virus lay eggs in small pools of standing water. Adult mosquitoes can hatch in 10 days in the warmest months of the summer. Mosquitoes become infected and transmit West Nile virus after feeding on birds carrying the virus. Within 10 to 14 days, the mosquito can transmit the virus to both humans and horses.

"Signs of West Nile Virus include weakness, fever, incoordination, seizures, blindness and difficulty getting up," Assistant State Veterinarian Dr. Michael Herrin said. "There are several vaccines available, and we are encouraging horse owners to visit with their veterinarian and determine the vaccination protocol that will best fit their situation."

Oklahomans can reduce the risk of West Nile virus by eliminating places where mosquitoes breed such as standing water. Horse owners should not let water stagnate in birdbaths or water tanks and should turn over wheelbarrows when not in use. When possible, owners should reduce horses' outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk, the times of day when mosquitoes that transmit the West Nile virus are most active.

Date: 2/18/2013



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search








Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives