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Kansas Farmers Union opposes equine assessment

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Recently, the Kansas House Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources introduced Bill No. 2090, "an act concerning livestock; relating to the establishment of the Kansas equine education and promotion board."

The bill proposes paying for the Board by assessing "$2 per ton of commercial equine feed sold in Kansas."

"The assessment is nothing more than a checkoff or a production tax," KFU President Donn Teske said.

In Kansas Farmers Union's 2013 Policy, it states "we support voluntary checkoffs at point of sale."

The bill does state that "any consumer who desires a refund of the assessment may make a written demand, including satisfactory proof of purchase, to the board within one year of the purchase of such feed." But it does not state that the refund will be granted.

The bill is still in committee and will likely make it to the House and Senate floors. To find your representative and contact information, visit kansasfarmersunion.org/Legislation.html. You can also find a copy of the bill at http://www.kansasfarmersunion.org.

Kansas Farmers Union is a general farm organization working to protect and enhance the economic interests and quality of life for family farmers and ranchers.

Date: 2/18/2013



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