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Increase profitability with the ABBA F-1, F-1 Plus programs


“Demand The Tag” has become a recognized slogan for cattle breeders enrolled in the American Brahman Breeders Association’s F-1 and F-1 Plus Programs across the nation. Along with environmental adaptability, built in efficiency, growth, maternal excellence and carcass quality the F-1 and F-1 Plus certified cattle are ideal to fit a wide array of marketing programs.

The American Brahman Breeders Association initiated the F-1 Certification Program in 1979 as a system to recognize the F-1 Female, as well as serve as a registration plan for the dam’s parentage. Since then, it has evolved into the most superior commercial female program in the United States. To date, the program has enrolled over 80,000 head.

Maximum heterosis is achieved through the crossing of two completely unrelated species of cattle (Bos indicus x Bos taurus). The ABBA understands that heterosis is the ‘bread and butter’ of the Brahman breed and its link to the commercial cowman. In the current restocking of much of the nation’s cowherd and the demand for proven and verified genetics, there is no better program to get involved in for progressive cattlemen.

The objective of the program is to guarantee maximum heterosis, as this benefits both the breeder and buyer of the F-1 Female. The only way to guarantee that you are receiving the full benefits of heterosis is through a Golden Certified or Certified F-1 Female that is carrying a certificate or eartag.

Set up into two divisions, Golden Certified F-1’s are the progeny of two registered parents. Certified F-1’s are the progeny of a registered sire and a qualified purebred dam.

Purebred non-registered cattle must be visually inspected by an ABBA official and can be enrolled for $6/head. This can be done with a ranch visit, photos, or by video. In both divisions the purity of the female is guaranteed with an eartag or certificate.

The ABBA F-1 Program is user friendly, inexpensive, and requires limited record keeping.

Fees include a $50, one time membership fee and a $7.50 per head F-1 certificate or eartag fee. For this, members receive a quarterly F-1 Newsletter, contact information listed on ABBA website, ability to list cattle on ABBA Buy/Sell Listing, eligible for special premiums, and eligibility to participate in ABBA National F-1 Sale each spring.

In an evaluation of the Houston Commercial Female Sale over a 15 year period, ABBA Golden Certified F-1’s received a $145.87 premium and Certified F-1’s received a $119.88 premium over all other breed crosses. That’s a significant difference where it counts most!

The American Brahman Breeders Association recently unveiled the F-1 Plus Program, which certifies progeny of Golden Certified and Certified F-1 Females and a registered sire. This program will allow producers to customize the genetics for the needs of a particular geographic region as well as provide an additional marketing opportunity for the users of ABBA Golden Certified and Certified F-1 cows.

Participants in the F-1 Plus Program must be a member of the ABBA F-1 Certification Program and purchase a F-1 Plus eartag at the $3.50 per head fee.

To enroll in either program, visit Brahman.org and download an application to be returned to ABBA at the Houston Headquarters.

Date: 4/8/2013



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