0320BiodieselDaysr.cfm National Biodiesel Day puts spotlight on America's advanced biofuel
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National Biodiesel Day puts spotlight on America's advanced biofuel

From the delivery of food and goods, to city fleets and transit systems, to construction and other heavy equipment, diesel-power is driving our economy and with it biodiesel use is on the rise.

“You don’t have to drive a diesel vehicle to feel the impact of diesel as it moves the freight that drives the economy,” said Gary Haer, National Biodiesel Board chairman. “Clean diesel technology, growing biodiesel production, and more light duty diesels on the market today are something to celebrate. It means more opportunities for biodiesel, more American jobs, and cleaner air.”

National Biodiesel Day is celebrated on March 18—the anniversary of Rudolf Diesel’s birthday. Diesel was a true pioneer, as the U.S. is moving closer to his century-old vision. When Diesel developed the first diesel engine it ran on a biofuel, peanut oil. He envisioned a time when vegetable oils would one day be as important as petroleum.

Biodiesel production topped 1 billion gallons in 2012 for the second consecutive year. With plants in nearly every state in the country, the industry supports more than 64,000 jobs nationwide and recently announced its new 10-year vision: 10 percent of the on-road diesel market by 2022.

Continued growth is expected with the increasing demand for diesel vehicles in the U.S. market. More than 33 light- and medium-duty diesel passenger cars and trucks, as well as heavy-duty diesel models from nearly 20 different brands, will be available in the market this year. According to recent published reports, clean diesel auto sales increased by 24 percent in 2012 over 2011, while the overall U.S. auto market increased by 13.5 percent. The Diesel Technology Forum predicts that diesel vehicle sales will increase to as much as 10 percent of the American market by 2020.

Consumers who want to stay informed about America’s Advanced Biofuel—from the latest biodiesel research and industry news, to local pump openings and grant opportunities—can join the Biodiesel Alliance & Backers. The Alliance & Backers program is open to all friends of biodiesel, ranging from farmers to fleet managers, to organizations, agencies and businesses. For more information, visit http://nbb.org/results/partnership-programs/alliance-backers.

Biodiesel is an advanced biofuel made from sustainable resources such as soybean oil, recycled grease and other fats and oils. It is the first and only EPA-designated Advanced Biofuel being produced on a commercial scale across the country.

Date: 4/15/2013



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