Malatya Haber Wetter winter predicted for Texas
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal
Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizer



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways


Reader Comment:
by Wheat_Harvest movie

"Thanks so much for the article! These are the types of people we hope to"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Wetter winter predicted for Texas

Advertisement

An El Nino currently developing in the tropical Pacific could mean an improved agricultural outlook for all of Texas, according to John Nielsen-Gammon, Ph.D., state climatologist and regents professor at Texas A&M University.

"An El Nino refers to unusually high tropical temperatures which shift the pattern of tropical convection, and usually leads to a cool and wet winter for Texas," Nielsen-Gammon said.

Though an El Nino's effects are usually stronger in southern parts of the state along the Gulf Coast, it generally causes shifts in weather patterns for the entire state, he said.

"It's a nice switch from the last couple of years, which were La Nina events which generally favor dry conditions," he said.

La Nina episodes are when the tropical Pacific temperatures are lower than average, he said.

Unfortunately for the Midwest and Mississippi Valley, an El Nino generally "signals" a drier-than-normal winter, according to Nielsen-Gammon.

Currently, tropical Pacific temperatures are about 0.5 to 1.0 degree Celsius (0.9 to 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal, Nielsen-Gammon said.

"Right now, it looks like a weak to moderate one," he said. "It would have be 1.5 to 2 degrees (2.7 to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) above normal to get a strong one."

But even a weak-to-moderate El Nino should have a pronounced effect of this fall's winter weather, he said.

"I just want to emphasize that wet conditions from an El Nino are not a sure thing, just like dry conditions with La Nina are not a sure thing," he said. "Last year, we saw La Nina conditions, but we ended up having above-normal rainfall across the state.

"For the sake of West Texas, I hope this El Nino comes through for us and gives us wet weather, but there's no guarantee of that."

North Atlantic temperatures are still running high, which is "a strike against us, especially for summer for fall," Nielsen-Gammon said. "But sometime around November, statistically the Pacific starts to take over, having a bigger effect on our weather."

Date: 9/3/2012



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search







Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives