Malatya Haber Planting into hard, dry soils
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Planting into hard, dry soils

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Kansas

Kansas farmers will soon begin planting wheat. Unless the weather pattern shifts dramatically from the abnormally dry conditions we've seen in the last 12 months, most of the state's prospective wheat fields will be hard and dry.

Jim Shroyer, agronomist with K-State Research and Extension, says farmers have three good ways to cope with hard, dry soils at planting.

"The best option is to plant wheat into the dust at the normal seeding depth and normal planting date, and hope for rain," Shroyer says. "The seed will remain viable in the soil until it gets enough moisture."

He suggests producers look at the long-term weather forecast to estimate how long the dry conditions will persist. If there is a good chance the dry weather will continue until at least the back end of the optimum range of planting dates, producers should treat the fields as if they were planting later: Increase seeding rates, consider using a fungicide seed treatment, and consider using a starter fertilizer.

"The idea is to make sure the wheat gets off to a good start and will have enough heads to have good yield potential, assuming it will eventually rain and the crop will emerge late. Wheat that emerges in November almost always has fewer fall tillers than wheat that emerges in September or October," Shroyer says.

There are some risks to this option. For one thing, a hard rain could crust over the soil or wash soil off planting ridges and into the seed furrows, potentially causing emergence problems. Another factor is the potential for wind erosion is the field lies unprotected with no ridges. Also, the wheat may not come up until spring, in which case it may have been better not to plant the wheat at all and plant a spring crop instead. Probably the worst-case scenario for this option would be if a light rain occurs and the seed gets just enough moisture to germinate the seed but not enough for the seedlings to emerge through the soil or to survive very long if dry conditions return. This could result in a loss of the stand.

Option two is to use a hoe drill to plant deeper-than-normal into moisture now, if possible. This option can work if the variety to be planted has a long coleoptile, the producer is using a hoe drill, and there is good moisture within reach. The advantage of this option is that the crop should come up and make a stand during the optimum time in the fall. This would keep the soil from blowing. Also, the ridges created by hoe drills also help keep the soil from blowing.

Shroyer says the risk to using a hoe drill and planting deep is poor emergence. "Deep-planted wheat normally has below-normal emergence, so a higher seeding rate should be used. Any rain that occurs before the seedlings have emerged could add additional soil into the seed furrow, making it even harder for the coleoptile to reach the soil surface," he explains. "Any time you increase the seeding depth, the seedling will have to stay within the soil just that much longer before emerging through the soil surface."

Delayed emergence leads to more potential for disease and pest problems, and reduced tillering potential late in the season. It's even possible that the wheat would get planted so deep that it would germinate but never emerge at all, especially if the coleoptile length is too short for the depth of planting. Generally speaking, it's best to plant no deeper than 3 inches with most varieties.

Finally, producers can wait for a rain, and then plant when soil moisture is adequate. Under the right conditions, this would result in good stands, assuming the producer uses a high seeding rate and a starter fertilizer, if appropriate. If it remains dry well past the optimum range of planting dates, the producer would then have the option of just keeping the wheat seed in the shed until next fall and planting spring crop next year instead.

The risk of this option is that the weather may turn rainy and stay wet later this fall, preventing the producer from planting the wheat at all while those who "dusted" their wheat in have a good stand. There is also the risk of leaving the soil unprotected from the wind through the winter until the spring crop is planted.

Crop insurance considerations and deadlines will play a role in these decisions.

The Kansas Wheat Commission is a grower-funded, grower-governed advocacy organization working to secure the future of Kansas wheat in the global market through research, education and market development. It is funded by a voluntary 1.5 cent assessment on each bushel of wheat produced in Kansas.

Date: 9/3/2012



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