1001KScropreportMRko.cfm Most producers get some rain
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Most producers get some rain

Kansas

Most Kansas producers saw some precipitation during the week ending Sept. 30, along with seasonable temperatures, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas Field Office, Oct. 1.

Fourteen stations received more than an inch of rain. Garnett led the state with 2.79 inches, followed by Liberal with 2.28 inches. Only five of 52 stations did not receive any measurable moisture for the week. Weekly high temperatures ranged from 97 degrees in Wilmore to a mild 78 degrees at Eskridge, while weekly lows were in the 30s and 40s with Holton recording the lowest at 32 degrees. Kansas producers averaged 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork, with the Southwest, East Central, and Southeast Districts averaging less than 5 suitable working days. With the precipitation, topsoil moisture supplies improved to 34 percent very short, 34 percent short, 32 percent adequate, and none surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies also improved to 51 percent very short, 35 percent short, 14 percent adequate, and none surplus. Producers continue harvesting corn, sorghum and some soybeans, with many stalks being baled for forage. Wheat seeding is in full force across the state and many producers are hoping for moisture to develop the 2013 crop.

Kansas farmers seeded 23 percent of the state's wheat acreage last week to reach 40 percent complete by Sept. 30, ahead of 36 percent for last year and 37 percent for the 5-year average. At least half of the crop in western Kansas is already seeded. Ten percent of the state's wheat had emerged by week's end which is identical to last year but slightly behind the 5-year average of12 percent.

Farmers harvested 10 percent of the Kansas corn crop last week, reaching 74 percent completed by Sept. 30, about three weeks ahead of 50 percent last year and 43 percent for the 5-year average.

Sixty-one percent of the soybean crop was dropping leaves, ahead of 60 percent last year but slightly behind 66 percent for the 5-year average. Twelve percent of the crop was harvested by Sept. 30, the same as 12 percent a year ago and slightly above 11 percent for the 5-year average. The condition of the soybean crop was 32 percent very poor, 33 percent poor, 27 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 2 percent excellent.

Sorghum harvest continued last week and reached 13 percent complete by Sept. 30, ahead of 4 percent last year and the 5-year average of 9 percent. Forty-one percent of the crop was mature, ahead of last year at 34 percent but just behind the 5-year average of 44 percent. Eighty-three percent was coloring, ahead of 81 percent last year but behind 91 percent for the 5-year average. The condition of the sorghum crop was 33 percent very poor, 33 percent poor, 25 percent fair, 8 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Seventy percent of the Kansas cotton crop had bolls opening, well ahead of 50 percent last year and 51 percent for the 5-year average, while a few fields had been harvested. The condition of the cotton crop was 7 percent very poor, 24 percent poor, 45 percent fair, 22 percent good, and 2 percent excellent.

Ninety-two percent of the sunflower crop had reached the ray flower dried stage, ahead of 90 percent for last year and 88 percent for the 5-year average. Eighty-three percent of the crop had turned yellow, ahead of 78 percent last year and 71 percent for the 5-year average. Fifty-six percent had turned brown by Sept. 30, slightly ahead of last year at 53 percent and well ahead of the 5-year average of 31 percent. Harvest reached 10 percent complete for the state by Sept. 30, ahead of 7 percent for last year and 4 percent for the 5-year average. The condition of the sunflower crop was 18 percent very poor, 28 percent poor, 43 percent fair, 10 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Five percent of the third cutting of alfalfa has yet to be harvested while the fourth cutting reached 61 percent complete, just ahead of last year at 60 percent but behind the 5-year average of 73 percent.

Range and pasture conditions improved slightly to 53 percent very poor, 28 percent poor, 16 percent fair, and 3 percent good. Even with the improvement, this continues to be the worst range and pasture conditions since the series started in 1995. Hay and forage supplies were 37 percent very short, 37 percent short, 25 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus; while stock water supplies improved slightly to 40 percent very short, 29 percent short, 31 percent adequate, and none surplus.

Date: 10/8/2012



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