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Drought taking a toll on corn farmer

By Stacy Hadrick

Throughout the majority of the United States this summer there has been an extreme drought. The lack of moisture has affected people that have not experienced abnormally dry conditions before. For farmers and ranchers no rain equals extra stress on their job of producing food.

Farmers look forward to planting a crop each year and waiting for it to grow and thrive. But this year for far to many the crops lacked the much needed moisture to reach their full potential.

Phil Stout of Charleston, Ill., loves his job as a farmer. Fall has always been his favorite time of year. But this year it's not as much fun to sit in the combine and harvest corn as years past. The drought has cut the corn harvest on Terry Dale Farms by 70 to 75 percent this season.

"It has been heartbreaking to see the short corn stalks with little to no ears of corn on them," said Stout.

He is very optimistic that Mother Nature will cooperate once again and the rains will come. Although it will be too late for this year's crop, he is already looking forward to next spring. "What I love about my job is it's something different all the time," said Stout.

Right now Stout is enjoying taking his young son with him in the combine. Dalton loves riding in the buddy seat of the combine where he can get a good view of corn harvest.

He has been employed at Terry Dale Farms for three years. The farm strives to increase the quality of life of their family, landowners and community. The farm's website terrydalefarms.com includes pictures of their farm, history and conservation practices they have put in place.

Date: 10/8/2012



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