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Winter Weather Awareness Day is Nov. 14


Kansas

As the days shorten and temperatures drop, thoughts turn to winter weather. The National Weather Service in conjunction with Kansas Emergency Management is observing Nov. 14 as Winter Weather Awareness Day in Kansas.

"While the short-term outlooks are calling for milder and drier than average conditions this winter, it only takes one storm to seriously make your life difficult," said Mary Knapp, state climatologist with K-State Research and Extension. "Remember, while the national average for tornado deaths is 70 per year, the national average for deaths on icy or snow-packed roads is more than 1,300 with an additional 100,000 injuries."

Knapp reviewed common terms used in winter forecasts, which come with recommended responses.

Winter storm: Severe winter conditions, which can vary by the storm. This can include a mix of snow, wind, ice, poor visibility and cold temperatures. Winter storm is coupled with one of the following terms:

Outlook: Winter storm conditions are possible in the next two to five days. Stay tuned to local media for updates and plan for expected conditions.

Advisory: Winter weather conditions are expected to cause significant inconveniences and may be hazardous. If you are cautious, these situations should not be life threatening.

Watch: Winter storm conditions are possible within the next 36 to 48 hours. Prepare now.

Warning: Life-threatening severe winter conditions have begun or will begin within 24 hours. Act now.

Information about Kansas weather is available on the Weather Data Library website: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/wdl. The Weather Data Library is based at Kansas State University. "Weather Wonders" audio reports are available on the K-State Research and Extension News Media and Marketing website at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news.

Review winter safety issues

Crisp fall weather now means wintry weather is not far off. That means there's no time like the present to review winter weather safety issues, according to Mary Knapp, state climatologist with K-State Research and Extension.

"As we move from fall to winter, in Kansas and the rest of the Central Plains, we can see rapidly changing weather conditions," Knapp said.

It is not unknown to have the warmest reading of the day occur in the early morning hours. It is also possible to have the high temperatures drop 40 degrees from one day to the next, she said.

"Differences between the high and low temperatures on a single day can be even greater. This means that whether you are walking to class or planning an afternoon hike, you should be prepared for the changing weather. Know what to expect and dress appropriately," Knapp said.

"At this time of the year, that usually means layers that you can add or remove as the conditions change. A little preparation will allow you to enjoy the weather, whatever it brings."

Information about Kansas weather is available on the Weather Data Library website: http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/wdl. The Weather Data Library is based at Kansas State University. "Weather Wonders" audio reports are available on the K-State Research and Extension News Media website at http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news.

Date: 11/12/2012



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