KLAresolution1picdrsr.cfm KLA supports proposed trichomoniasis regulation
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KLA supports proposed trichomoniasis regulation

By Doug Rich


PROPOSED REGULATION—Dr. Bill Brown, Kansas animal health commissioner, explained the new trichomoniasis regulation proposed by the Kansas Department of Agriculture. KLA members amended and passed a resolution during their business session supporting this new regulation. (Journal photo by Doug Rich.)

Kansas Livestock Association members amended a resolution at the 100th convention supporting changes to the trichomoniasis rule proposed by the Kansas Department of Agriculture. The resolution was debated during the Stockgrowers Council meeting on Nov. 29 in Wichita, Kan.

A year ago KLA introduced a resolution to expand the existing regulation on trichomoniasis to include change of ownership of the non-virgin bull and some type of training or certification for veterinarians in the state who collect, handle, store, and ship trichomoniasis samples. Based on this resolution Dr. Bill Brown, Kansas animal health commissioner, put together a working group made up of four veterinarians and four livestock producers to consider changes to the state trichomoniasis regulation.

A new regulation, K.A.R. 9-7-4, was proposed and it is in a 60-day comment period. So far the state has received about 10 written comments and all but one have been positive toward the new regulation. Brown said a public hearing would be held on Jan. 10, 2013. Then it will be published in the Kansas register and 15 days later it will be an official registration.

In Brown's comments during the Cattle Feeders Council meeting, he stressed that this regulation is based on those two things put forward in last year's KLA regulation and it increased the time that the test is valid from 30 days to 60 days. Brown said this really helps out the purebred breeders.

The proposed regulation will require any non-virgin bull, 19 months of age or older, or bull of unknown virginity status that changes ownership in Kansas by private sale, public sale, public sale, less, trade, or barter but does not go directly to slaughter be certified negative for trichomoniasis.

The resolution amended and passed by KLA members this year states that KLA supports additional trichomoniasis testing requirements for virgin and non-virgin bulls over 18 months of age at change of ownership in Kansas. The resolution also supports a state regulation requiring veterinarians to become certified in trichomoniasis testing procedures. Finally, the resolution supports changes to state law or regulations to allow timely notification to the owners of neighboring herds when a confirmed positive trichomoniasis bull or cow is discovered in Kansas.

"We had a flurry of trichomoniasis cases last spring, then nothing over the summer, then in the last two months we have six or seven cases," Brown said.

Brown said there are peripheral issues dealing with trichomoniasis that still need to be considered. These include whether there should be a specific tag for trichomoniasis tested bulls, whether herds should be quarantined, whether we should go back and look at 18 months versus 24 months for testing, notification of positive cases, and uniformity of regulations among states.

Doug Rich can be reached by phone at 785-749-5304

Date: 12/10/2012



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