1005QUWFSignsMemorandumofUn.cfm QUWF signs conservation partnership
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QUWF signs conservation partnership

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At the recent 100th annual meeting of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies of the U.S. and Canada, held in Grand Rapids, Mich., Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation set a new milestone in being the first conservation organization to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with both the U.S. Forest Service and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, in the same document, to commonly promote and engage multi-specie wildlife conservation work on public and private lands nationwide. "We are very excited that QUWF has reached a national level where-in our national staff, sponsors, partners, chapters and members are working with the USFS and NRCS to build a future for wildlife and its critical habitat," said Craig A. Alderman, Director of QUWF.

"This partnership with QUWF is what makes the difference, we cannot do this alone but only as a united force for conservation and our wildlife," stated Jim Pena, deputy chief of the U.S. Forest Service, National Forest System, as he signed the document with Craig at the Forest Service Partners meeting. Also representing QUWF at the signing from its national office in Buffalo, Mo., were Lynzee Glass, admin manager, and Nick Prough, chief biologist and director of chapter development.

"We have to engage landscape partners with the USFS and NRCS as the diverse habitat requirements span a host of geography from coast to coast," emphasizes Nick Prough, chief biologist for QUWF. "Our western chapters , for example, spend untold volunteer hours and raise many dollars to maintain hundreds of watering sites called guzzlers, on our national forests. This enables QUWF's sole purpose of "turning-the dirt" for habitat and wildlife population recovery to accept the challenge of private and public land needs. We may not be the biggest, but we ensure we are the most engaged in immediate, hands on work on the ground with our chapters and partners," concludes Prough.

David White, chief of the NRCS, also signed the agreement with QUWF to further build cooperation and programs with its valuable offices and staff nationwide. "We could not be more activated to do a better job in conservation because of this agreement," concluded Alderman.



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