1216OKFBinhofeawardko.cfm Sen. Jim Inhofe earns Farm Bureau Golden Plow Award
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Sen. Jim Inhofe earns Farm Bureau Golden Plow Award

Oklahoma

The American Farm Bureau Federation has honored U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-OK, with its Golden Plow award, the highest honor the organization bestows on members of Congress.

"I believe that American farmers are the backbone of our nation--a diverse domestic supply of food and fiber is the foundation of our security, our social values and our economy," Sen. Inhofe said. "I am deeply honored to receive the American Farm Bureau Golden Plow award, and will continue to do all I can to fight for the American farmer in Washington."

"Senator Inhofe is a steadfast supporter of agriculture," said Oklahoma Farm Bureau President Mike Spradling. "His long-time record as a strong, effective advocate of farmers and ranchers makes him an excellent choice for the Golden Plow award."

Sen. Inhofe, a lifelong Oklahoman from Tulsa, was elected to the United States Senate in 1994. He currently serves on the Armed Services Committee, the Foreign Relations Committee and as ranking member of the Environment and Public Works Committee.

Oklahoma Farm Bureau's nomination of Sen. Inhofe for the award cited numerous examples of his work on critical Farm Bureau issues. He has led the fight in the Senate to stop cap-and-trade legislation, noting Farm Bureau's "Don't CAP Our Future" campaign against climate change legislation during a speech on the Senate floor.

As chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works and now the ranking minority member, Sen. Inhofe has held hearings on behalf of Farm Bureau and agriculture on numerous issues, including the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, the Water Resources Development Act, endangered species, climate change, wetlands and the Clean Water Act.

Sen. Inhofe also worked to include a compromise solution in the 2007 Farm Bill, authorizing USDA to give priority consideration to grant proposals that allow agricultural operators to make use of animal waste, specifically poultry waste, for use as fertilizers, energy production, and other useful by-products aimed at identifying new ways to create an environmentally friendly use of poultry waste.

"Too many times, our farmers face unnecessary mandates, oppressive federal regulations, and an overreaching government bureaucracy," Sen. Inhofe said. "In addition to fighting against the cap-and-trade legislation that would have a devastating impact on our nation's agricultural community, I am committed to protecting private property; promoting alternative energies, such as cellulosic biomass ethanol, that do not compete with feedstock; maintaining a strong safety net for those that provide us with a safe, reliable, and affordable food supply; and ensuring trade doors remain open so that our farmers and ranchers have marketing opportunities abroad."

AFBF presents Golden Plow awards to one House member and one Senate member each year. Farm Bureau awards the Golden Plow to a member of Congress, regardless of party affiliation, whose philosophy or record demonstrates his or her commitment to the private enterprise system; sound agricultural policies supported by Farm Bureau; fiscal conservatism; and reduced federal regulations on businesses and individuals.



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