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High temps cause some cattle losses

Nebraska

For the week ending June 28, warm temperatures and high humidity helped push crop development, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office, June 29.

Over three-fourths of the wheat was turning color and the first fields have been harvested in the Southeast and South Central Districts. Farmers were focused on applying herbicides and baling hay. Livestock producers were busy trying to keep animals from over heating due to the high temperatures combined with high humidity. Significant losses were reported in several counties.

Temperatures averaged 2 degrees above normal; however, temperatures in the Panhandle were below normal. The highs ranged into triple digits to lows in the high 40's. Over a half inch of rain was recorded in all districts except for the East Central and Northeast Districts. Both top soil and subsoil moisture conditions are the best they have been since 2000.

Corn conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 13 percent fair, 56 percent good, and 26 percent excellent, well above last year's 70 percent good or excellent rating. Irrigated fields rated 81 percent good or excellent with dryland fields rated 83 percent, both above year ago levels.

Soybean conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 2 percent poor, 12 percent fair, 62 percent good, and 23 percent excellent, well above last year's 69 percent good or excellent condition. Soybeans blooming were 2 percent complete ahead of last year but behind the 8 percent average.

Wheat conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 6 percent poor, 19 percent fair, 54 percent good, and 19 percent excellent, well above last year's 58 percent good or excellent condition. Wheat turning color was 77 percent, ahead of last year's 72 percent but six days behind the average of 87 percent. Wheat ripe was 13 percent, ahead of last year's 3 percent but 6 days behind the average of 32 percent. The first fields were being harvested.

Alfalfa conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 8 percent poor, 25 percent fair, 53 percent good, and 12 percent excellent, below last year's 74 percent good or excellent condition. First cutting was 92 percent complete, ahead of last year's 88 percent but behind the average of 96 percent. Second cutting was 15 percent complete, well ahead of last year's 4 percent but behind the 21 percent average.

Oat conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 9 percent fair, 66 percent good, and 18 percent excellent, below last year's 91 percent good or excellent condition. Oats headed was 86 percent, near last year's 83 percent but behind the 91 percent average. The first fields have been harvested for grain.

Sorghum conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 3 percent poor, 22 percent fair, 64 percent good, and 11 percent excellent, above last year's 69 percent good or excellent condition. Sorghum emerged was 96 percent, ahead of last year's 92 percent but even with the average.

Dry bean conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 15 percent poor, 24 percent fair, 49 percent good, and 10 percent excellent, well above the 44 percent good or excellent last year. Dry bean emerged was 80 percent, behind last year's 88 percent and the 90 percent average.

Proso millet planted was 66 percent, a week behind last year's 88 percent and six days behind the 82 percent average.

Pasture and range conditions rated 0 percent very poor, 3 percent poor, 18 percent fair, 59 percent good, and 20 percent excellent, above last year's 71 percent good or excellent condition.



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