0713OKcropreportMRko.cfm No break in hot, dry weather
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No break in hot, dry weather

Oklahoma

Extreme heat and minimal rainfall was experienced in Oklahoma during the week ending July 13, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Oklahoma Field Office, July 12.

All nine districts reached temperatures of over 100 degrees, with the statewide high of 115 recorded in Buffalo on July 9. Over the weekend, a wildfire broke out in Major County and has reportedly burned nearly 50,000 acres. Some areas received light showers midweek, although the benefit of the rain was quickly offset by a return to above normal temperatures. Most of the state is in desperate need of moisture. Both topsoil and subsoil moisture conditions continued to worsen, with topsoil rated mostly in the short to very short range and subsoil rated mostly in the adequate to short range. There were 6.2 days suitable for field work.

Three-quarters of the state's winter wheat acres had been plowed by week's end; 20 points ahead of last year and 16 points ahead of the five-year average. Seventy-two percent of the state's rye acres had been plowed, 11 points ahead of normal. Oats plowed reached 71 percent, up 20 points from the previous week and 12 points ahead of normal.

Extreme heat is beginning to take a toll on row crops. Drought-like conditions continued and row crop conditions are rated mostly in the good to fair range. Meaningful rainfall is needed in most areas. Corn silking reached 60 percent, six points behind the five-year average. Eighteen percent of the state's corn crop had reached the dough stage of development by week's end, nine points behind last year. Nearly all of the state's sorghum crop had been planted by week's end, slightly behind normal. Sorghum emerged reached 76 percent, seven points behind the five-year average. Soybeans emerged reached 96 percent, up eight points from the previous week and 13 points ahead of normal. A quarter of the state's soybean crop reached the blooming stage of development, two percentage points ahead of the five-year average. By week's end, peanuts pegging increased to 60 percent, 16 percentage points behind normal. Cotton squaring reached 65 percent, 11 points ahead of the five-year average.

Nearly the state's entire watermelon crop had developed runners by week's end, while watermelons setting fruit increased 16 points to 82 percent, eight points behind the five-year average. A small portion of the state's watermelon crop has been harvested. Precipitation is needed to improve the state's hay crop. Conditions of both alfalfa and other hay worsened, but rated mostly in the good to fair range. Nearly all of the state's alfalfa received a second cutting by week's end, while a third of the crop received a third cutting, 17 points behind the five-year average. The first cutting of other hay reached 79 percent complete, up seven points from last week but one point behind normal. A small portion of other hay received a second cutting by week's end.

Pasture and range conditions again declined, but continued to rate mostly in the good to fair range. Recent rains have improved pasture conditions in some areas while other areas are still in dire need of moisture.

Livestock: Prices for feeder steers less than 800 pounds averaged $103 per cwt. Prices for heifers less than 800 pounds averaged $97 per cwt. Extreme heat is beginning to affect livestock, although conditions continued to rate in the mostly good to fair range. Average livestock marketings were reported last week.



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