Smallgrainsimprovewithrainb.cfm Small grains improve with rain, but more moisture needed
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Small grains improve with rain, but more moisture needed

Texas

Northeast Texas received anywhere from 0.5 inches to 4 inches of rain while most of the rest of the state received 0.01 to 0.5 inches of rain during the last week of January, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Texas Field Office, Feb. 2.

Small grain fields improved after recent rains across most of the state; however, conditions are still very dry and wheat could use more moisture. Fertilizer spreading on wheat fields continued in the High Plains. Cotton field preparation and stalk shredding were underway in Trans-Pecos and the Northern Low Plains. In South Texas, dry land sorghum producers began seed bed preparation. Rainfall was needed so they can begin planting in the next three to four weeks. Pecans in Trans-Pecos were being pruned and hedged. Onion growth was progressing well in South Texas due to cool growing conditions. Supplemental feeding of livestock was on going across most of the state. Producers in the Blacklands and South Texas were considering reducing their herd size due to dry conditions. Pasture and range land remained dry and was in need of rain across most of the state. Top soil moisture was mostly very short to short across the state.

Small grain fields improved after recent rains across most of the state, however, conditions are still very dry and wheat could use more moisture. Fertilizer spreading on wheat fields continued in the High Plains. Statewide, wheat condition was mostly very poor to poor and oat condition was mostly very poor to poor.

Cotton field preparation and stalk shredding were underway in Trans-Pecos and the Northern Low Plains.

In South Texas, dry land sorghum producers began seed bed preparation. Rainfall was needed so they can begin planting in the next three to four weeks.

Pecans in Trans-Pecos were being pruned and hedged. Fall planted onions in Trans-Pecos were dormant. Onion growth was progressing well in South Texas due to cool growing conditions. Spinach producers prepared for a second cut of fields harvested earlier in the season.

Supplemental feeding of livestock was on going across most of the state. Producers in the Blacklands and South Texas were considering reducing their herd size due to dry conditions. Livestock in the Cross Timbers were stressed due to the cold weather. Pasture and range land remained dry and was in need of rain across most of the state. Range and pasture condition was mostly very poor to poor statewide.

Date: 2/5/09


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