Controllingpredatorsandnuis.cfm Controlling predators and nuisance animals
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Controlling predators and nuisance animals

Kansas

As warmer weather approaches, ranchers are busy preparing for calving season. Their goal is to get healthy calves on the ground and raise a good calf crop. Besides concerns of vaccinations and nutrition programs, keeping the young calves from being prey is also a concern. According to Andrea Burns, Ford County agriculture and natural resources Extension agent, some farmers and ranchers in the area have seen an increase in the coyote population.

"They are concerned and are looking for ways to safely manage them," Burns said. "As planting time approaches and deer populations are continuing to increase, keeping nuisance animals from damaging crops and fences is becoming more and more of a challenge for producers."

Charles Lees, Wildlife Control Extension Specialist, from Kansas State University will present information for farmers and ranchers on controlling coyotes. Craig Curtis from the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, will present helpful information and answer questions about permits to control nuisance animals that may be causing damage to crops and fences.

A meeting to address these issues is being sponsored by Ford County K-State Research and Extension Feb. 26, beginning at 6 p.m. This meeting is free and open to the public. Please contact the Ford County Extension office if you plan to attend, so that handout materials can be appropriately provided. You can RSVP by calling 620-227-4542 or e-mail Andrea Burns, Ford County Extension agent at aburns@ksu.edu.



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