0710ARSpepperhasmultipleuse.cfm Antifungal pepper compound has potential
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways
Reader Comment:
by Wheat_Harvest movie

"Thanks so much for the article! These are the types of people we hope to"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.




Antifungal pepper compound has potential

Dried, ground cayenne peppers have been spicing up cuisine for thousands of years. Now, Agricultural Research Service scientists and colleagues have found that a patented antifungal plant compound in cayenne, called CAY-1, holds promise for dual use as an antifungal in both agriculture and medicine.

The substance is believed to work by attaching to fungal membranes, where it causes cell components to leak, eventually killing the cell. CAY-1 may also enter fungal cells, and adversely affect certain signaling pathways that, in turn, damage the mitochondria--the powerhouses for several cellular processes--in cells.

Anthony De Lucca, a microbiologist with the Food and Feed Safety Research Unit at the ARS Southern Regional Research Center in New Orleans, La., led a study in which he and colleagues isolated 10 fungi--either primary or secondary grape pathogens--from diseased grapes grown in a hot, humid environment. Primary pathogens directly cause infection, whereas secondary pathogens infect after the hosts' defenses have been compromised by stress, injury, or other infection.



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search



Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives