Despiterainssomeareasstilln.cfm Despite rains some areas still need moisture
Home News Livestock Crops Markets Hay, Range & Pasture Home & Family Classifieds Resources This Week's Journal



Farm Survey


AgriMartin
Journal Getaways


Reader Comment:
by Greater Franklin County

"Thanks for picking up the story about our Buy One Product Local campaign --- we're"....Read the story...
Join other discussions.

Despite rains some areas still need moisture

Texas

The eastern part of the state received up to 15 inches of moisture while the rest of the state received moderate amounts of rainfall during the week ending April 19, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Texas Field Office, April 20.

Producers continued to supplement wheat fields with irrigation in the Southern Low Plains. Cotton field preparation took place in parts of the Plains as the recent rainfall improved planting conditions. Cotton was progressing well in South Texas. Across the state, corn was under stress due to the recent freeze. Sorghum producers were preparing their land for planting in the Northern High Plains. Onions were progressing well in the Trans-Pecos and were ready to bulb. Pecans were breaking dormancy in the Trans-Pecos. Supplemental feeding of livestock continued across the state. Conditions in South Texas were still very dry and moisture was needed to establish vegetation in pastures and rangeland. Top soil moisture was mostly very short to adequate across the state.

Russian aphids and green bugs continued to damage the wheat crop in the Northern High Plains. Producers supplemented wheat fields with irrigation in the Southern Low Plains. Across the state, the wheat and oat crop was under stress from the recent freeze. Statewide, wheat condition was mostly very poor to poor and oat condition was mostly very poor to poor.

Cotton field preparation took place in parts of the Plains as the recent rainfall improved planting conditions. Producers were planting in the Blacklands. Cotton was progressing well in South Texas due to favorable weather conditions for the crop.

Corn fields were being planted in the Northern High Plains. Across the state, corn was under stress due to the recent freeze. Planting continued in South Central Texas. Corn was progressing well in South Texas as producers increased irrigation. Corn condition was mostly fair to good statewide.

Sorghum producers were preparing their land for planting in the Northern High Plains. Planting was almost complete in South Texas. Sorghum condition was mostly poor to fair statewide.

The peach crop in the Cross Timbers was under stress due to the recent freeze as producers lost most of their crop. In the Blacklands, sunflowers were being planted on damaged wheat fields from the recent freeze. Onions were progressing well in the Trans-Pecos and were ready to bulb. Cabbage harvest continued in South Texas and the Lower Valley. Pecans were breaking dormancy in the Trans-Pecos. Pecans had reached bloom stage in all varieties in South Texas.

Supplemental feeding of livestock continued across the state. Spring calving continued in South East Texas. In the Edwards Plateau, ranchers were shearing sheep and goats while marking lambs. Pastures responded well in East Texas from the recent rainfall. Conditions in South Texas were still very dry and moisture was needed to establish vegetation in pastures and rangeland. Range and pasture condition was mostly very poor to fair statewide.



Google
 
Web hpj.com

Copyright 1995-2014.  High Plains Publishers, Inc.  All rights reserved.  Any republishing of these pages, including electronic reproduction of the editorial archives or classified advertising, is strictly prohibited. If you have questions or comments you can reach us at
High Plains Journal 1500 E. Wyatt Earp Blvd., P.O. Box 760, Dodge City, KS 67801 or call 1-800-452-7171. Email: webmaster@hpj.com

 

Archives Search



Inside Futures

Editorial Archives

Browse Archives